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Foot loading is different in people with and without pincer nails: a case control study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, August 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Foot loading is different in people with and without pincer nails: a case control study
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13047-015-0100-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hitomi Sano, Kaori Shionoya, Rei Ogawa

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that pincer nails are caused by lack of upward mechanical forces on the toe pad. However, clinically significant pincer nails are also often observed among healthy walkers. It was hypothesized that in these cases, the affected toes do not receive adequate physical stimulation from walking and loading. To test this, the gait characteristics of pincer nail cases were assessed by measuring plantar pressure during walking. In total, 12 bilateral pincer nail cases (24 affected feet) and 12 age- and sex-controlled healthy control subjects (24 ft) were enrolled in this prospective case-control study. Plantar pressure during free ambulation in both the barefoot and shod state was assessed using a digital pressure-plate system named S-Plate platform (Medicapteurs Co. France). First toe pressure and the frequencies of peak pressure in the first toe, metatarsal head, or other foot areas were calculated. In both the barefoot and shod state, the pincer nail group had significantly lower pressure on the first toe than the control group. In both the barefoot and shod state, the peak pressure area was mostly the metatarsal head area in the pincer nail group, whereas it was mostly the first toe area in the control group. Binomial logistic regression analysis revealed that peak pressure area was a significant risk factor for pincer nail development. Walking behavior appears to contribute to pincer nail development. Pincer nails of walkers could be treated by correcting the walking behaviour so that more pressure is placed on the toe pad.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 42%
Student > Master 5 13%
Other 3 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Sports and Recreations 2 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 6 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2015.
All research outputs
#3,046,390
of 15,728,229 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#267
of 606 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,348
of 240,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,728,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 606 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,489 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them