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Influencing factors on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels in Japanese chronic hepatitis C patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
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Title
Influencing factors on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels in Japanese chronic hepatitis C patients
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1020-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masanori Atsukawa, Akihito Tsubota, Noritomo Shimada, Kai Yoshizawa, Hiroshi Abe, Toru Asano, Yusuke Ohkubo, Masahiro Araki, Tadashi Ikegami, Chisa Kondo, Norio Itokawa, Ai Nakagawa, Taeang Arai, Yoko Matsushita, Katsuhisa Nakatsuka, Tomomi Furihata, Yoshimichi Chuganji, Yasushi Matsuzaki, Yoshio Aizawa, Katsuhiko Iwakiri

Abstract

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels are generally lower in chronic hepatitis C patients than in healthy individuals. The purpose of this study is to clarify the factors which affect serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels using data obtained from Japanese chronic hepatitis C patients. The subjects were 619 chronic hepatitis C patients. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were measured by using double-antibody radioimmunoassay between April 2009 and August 2014. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels of 20 ng/mL or less were classified as vitamin D deficiency, and those with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels of 30 ng/mL or more as vitamin D sufficiency. The relationship between patient-related factors and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels was analyzed. The cohort consisted of 305 females and 314 males, aged between 18 and 89 years (median, 63 years). The median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level was 21 ng/mL (range, 6-61 ng/mL). On the other hand, the median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level in the healthy subjects was 25 ng/mL (range, 7-52), being significantly higher than that those in 80 chronic hepatitis C patients matched for age, gender, and season (p = 1.16 × 10(-8)). In multivariate analysis, independent contributors to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 deficiency were as follows: female gender (p = 2.03 × 10(-4), odds ratio = 2.290, 95 % confidence interval = 1.479-3.545), older age (p = 4.30 × 10(-4), odds ratio = 1.038, 95 % confidence interval = 1.017-1.060), cold season (p = 0.015, odds ratio = 1.586, 95 % confidence interval = 1.095-2.297), and low hemoglobin level (p = 0.037, odds ratio = 1.165, 95 % confidence interval = 1.009-1.345). By contrast, independent contributors to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 sufficiency were male gender (p = 0.001, odds ratio = 3.400, 95 % confidence interval = 1.635-7.069), warm season (p = 0.014, odds ratio = 1.765, 95 % confidence interval = 1.117-2.789) and serum albumin (p = 0.016, OR = 2.247, 95 % CI = 1.163-4.342). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels in chronic hepatitis C Japanese patients were influenced by gender, age, hemoglobin level, albumin and the season of measurement.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 15%
Librarian 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Professor 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 5 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Arts and Humanities 1 8%
Unknown 6 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,931,879
of 5,561,865 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,146
of 2,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,567
of 192,234 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#121
of 147 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,561,865 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,899 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 192,234 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 147 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.