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Describing the diurnal relationships between objectively measured mother and infant physical activity

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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66 Mendeley
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Title
Describing the diurnal relationships between objectively measured mother and infant physical activity
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0692-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessandra Prioreschi, Soren Brage, Kate Westgate, Lisa K. Micklesfield

Abstract

Evidence for the importance of accumulating sufficient physical activity in the early years is mounting. This study aimed to determine the relationship between maternal and infant objectively measured physical activity, and to examine the diurnal interactions between these behaviours while accounting for potential covariates. Mothers and infants (n = 152 pairs; infants aged 3-24 months) were recruited from Soweto, South Africa, and physical activity was measured using a wrist worn accelerometer (Axivity AX3, Axivity Ltd., Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK) for 3-7 days. Mothers completed sleep diaries recording night time-in-bed (used as a proxy for nocturnal sleep status) for themselves and their infant; and reported times during which their infant was in their personal care (caregiver status) for each day during the measurement period. Significant correlates of infant physical activity, as well as the interactions between mother's physical activity, day of the week, sleep status, and caregiver status, were included in panel regression analyses with infant physical activity as the outcome. There was an equal distribution of boys and girls, and their age ranged from 2.6 to 24.5 months. The majority of mothers (73%) did not spend any time apart from their infant. During weekdays, the combined effect of mother's physical activity (β=0.11), the interactions between mother's physical activity and caregiver status (β=0.17), and sleep status (β= - 0.04) on infant physical activity was β=0.24; while during weekend days this association was β=0.21; and was largely moderated by the interaction between the mother being with the infant and her activity levels (β=0.23), but partly attenuated by mother's physical activity independent of other variables (β= - 0.04). For each hour of the day, for both mother and infant, peaks of physical activity were higher when the mother was not the primary caregiver. Infant physical activity levels were strongly associated with their mother's activity levels particularly during the week; this relationship was stronger when mothers were more active while looking after their infant. Mothers should be encouraged to be active when looking after their children, particularly during the week, and to provide infants with as much opportunity to be active as possible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 16 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 11 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Sports and Recreations 7 11%
Psychology 6 9%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 20 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,828,923
of 13,145,206 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,033
of 1,336 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,973
of 268,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#9
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,145,206 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,336 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.0. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.