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Potential utility of natural products as regulators of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, June 2011
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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51 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Potential utility of natural products as regulators of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, June 2011
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-9-91
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shabana I Khan, Jianping Zhao, Ikhlas A Khan, Larry A Walker, Asok K Dasmahapatra

Abstract

Aromatase, the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, converts androstenedione to estrone and testosterone to estradiol. The enzyme is expressed in various tissues such as ovary, placenta, bone, brain, skin, and adipose tissue. Aromatase enzyme is encoded by a single gene CYP 19A1 and its expression is controlled by tissue-specific promoters. Aromatase mRNA is primarily transcribed from promoter I.4 in normal breast tissue and physiological levels of aromatase are found in breast adipose stromal fibroblasts. Under the conditions of breast cancer, as a result of the activation of a distinct set of aromatase promoters (I.3, II, and I.7) aromatase expression is enhanced leading to local overproduction of estrogen that promotes breast cancer. Aromatase is considered as a potential target for endocrine treatment of breast cancer but due to nonspecific reduction of aromatase activity in other tissues, aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are associated with undesirable side effects such as bone loss, and abnormal lipid metabolism. Inhibition of aromatase expression by inactivating breast tumor-specific aromatase promoters can selectively block estrogen production at the tumor site. Although several synthetic chemical compounds and nuclear receptor ligands are known to inhibit the activity of the tumor-specific aromatase promoters, further development of more specific and efficacious drugs without adverse effects is still warranted. Plants are rich in chemopreventive agents that have a great potential to be used in chemotherapy for hormone dependent breast cancer which could serve as a source for natural AIs. In this brief review, we summarize the studies on phytochemicals such as biochanin A, genistein, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, resveratrol, and grape seed extracts related to their effect on the activation of breast cancer-associated aromatase promoters and discuss their aromatase inhibitory potential to be used as safer chemotherapeutic agents for specific hormone-dependent breast cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 73 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Master 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 19 25%
Unknown 13 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 18 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2013.
All research outputs
#7,503,488
of 12,445,189 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#256
of 498 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,175
of 106,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#2
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,445,189 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 498 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 106,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.