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Predicting potential ranges of primary malaria vectors and malaria in northern South America based on projected changes in climate, land cover and human population

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

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178 Mendeley
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Title
Predicting potential ranges of primary malaria vectors and malaria in northern South America based on projected changes in climate, land cover and human population
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1033-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Temitope O. Alimi, Douglas O. Fuller, Whitney A. Qualls, Socrates V. Herrera, Myriam Arevalo-Herrera, Martha L. Quinones, Marcus V. G. Lacerda, John C. Beier

Abstract

Changes in land use and land cover (LULC) as well as climate are likely to affect the geographic distribution of malaria vectors and parasites in the coming decades. At present, malaria transmission is concentrated mainly in the Amazon basin where extensive agriculture, mining, and logging activities have resulted in changes to local and regional hydrology, massive loss of forest cover, and increased contact between malaria vectors and hosts. Employing presence-only records, bioclimatic, topographic, hydrologic, LULC and human population data, we modeled the distribution of malaria and two of its dominant vectors, Anopheles darlingi, and Anopheles nuneztovari s.l. in northern South America using the species distribution modeling platform Maxent. Results from our land change modeling indicate that about 70,000 km(2) of forest land would be lost by 2050 and 78,000 km(2) by 2070 compared to 2010. The Maxent model predicted zones of relatively high habitat suitability for malaria and the vectors mainly within the Amazon and along coastlines. While areas with malaria are expected to decrease in line with current downward trends, both vectors are predicted to experience range expansions in the future. Elevation, annual precipitation and temperature were influential in all models both current and future. Human population mostly affected An. darlingi distribution while LULC changes influenced An. nuneztovari s.l. distribution. As the region tackles the challenge of malaria elimination, investigations such as this could be useful for planning and management purposes and aid in predicting and addressing potential impediments to elimination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 2%
United States 2 1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Philippines 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 166 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 20%
Researcher 30 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Professor 9 5%
Other 28 16%
Unknown 31 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 26%
Environmental Science 27 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 11 6%
Computer Science 7 4%
Other 35 20%
Unknown 37 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2022.
All research outputs
#5,057,852
of 20,710,163 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,003
of 5,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,379
of 251,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,710,163 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,095 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,249 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them