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HIV-1 protease cleaves the serine-threonine kinases RIPK1 and RIPK2

Overview of attention for article published in Retrovirology, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
HIV-1 protease cleaves the serine-threonine kinases RIPK1 and RIPK2
Published in
Retrovirology, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12977-015-0200-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roland N. Wagner, John C. Reed, Sumit K. Chanda

Abstract

HIV-1 protease (PR) is essential for viral infectivity as it cleaves Gag and Gag-Pol polyprotein precursors during viral maturation. Recent evidence suggests that cellular proteins can also be cleaved by PR, perhaps representing an important viral strategy to counter host defense mechanisms. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) and RIPK2 belong to a family of serine/threonine kinases with conserved domain architecture and important functions in apoptosis, necrosis and innate immunity. We found that RIPK1 and RIPK2 but not other members of the RIP kinase family are cleaved by HIV-1 PR. In RIPK1, we identified a putative PR cleavage site; a mutation at this site rendered RIPK1 resistant to PR cleavage. RIPK1 and RIPK2 were cleaved during HIV-1 infection of T cell lines or primary activated CD4(+) T cells. Interfering with the viral life cycle at different stages by the addition of specific inhibitors against RT, integrase, or PR, completely prevented RIPK1 and RIPK2 cleavage. Cleavage of RIPK1 disrupted RIPK1/RIPK3 complex formation and RIPK1-mediated induction of NF-kB. These findings indicate that RIPK1 and RIPK2 are targets of HIV-1 PR activity during infection, and their inactivation may contribute to modulation of cell death and host defense pathways by HIV-1.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 46 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 31%
Student > Bachelor 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 15%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 April 2016.
All research outputs
#2,727,683
of 10,677,937 outputs
Outputs from Retrovirology
#145
of 540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,935
of 235,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Retrovirology
#7
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,677,937 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,304 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.