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Long-term weight loss trajectories following participation in a randomised controlled trial of a weight management programme for men delivered through professional football clubs: a longitudinal…

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
43 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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135 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term weight loss trajectories following participation in a randomised controlled trial of a weight management programme for men delivered through professional football clubs: a longitudinal cohort study and economic evaluation
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12966-018-0683-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cindy M. Gray, Sally Wyke, Ruiqi Zhang, Annie S. Anderson, Sarah Barry, Nicki Boyer, Graham Brennan, Andrew Briggs, Christopher Bunn, Craig Donnachie, Eleanor Grieve, Ciaran Kohli-Lynch, Suzanne M. Lloyd, Alex McConnachie, Colin McCowan, Alice MacLean, Nanette Mutrie, Kate Hunt

Abstract

Obesity is a major public health concern requiring innovative interventions that support people to lose weight and keep it off long term. However, weight loss maintenance remains a challenge and is under-researched, particularly in men. The Football Fans in Training (FFIT) programme engages men in weight management through their interest in football, and encourages them to incorporate small, incremental physical activity and dietary changes into daily life to support long-term weight loss maintenance. In 2011/12, a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of FFIT demonstrated effectiveness and cost-effectiveness at 12 months. The current study aimed to investigate long-term maintenance of weight loss, behavioural outcomes and lifetime cost-effectiveness following FFIT. A longitudinal cohort study comprised 3.5-year follow-up of the 747 FFIT RCT participants. Men aged 35-65 years, BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2 at RCT baseline who consented to long-term follow-up (n = 665) were invited to participate: those in the FFIT Follow Up Intervention group (FFIT-FU-I) undertook FFIT in 2011 during the RCT; the FFIT Follow Up Comparison group (FFIT-FU-C) undertook FFIT in 2012 under routine (non-research) conditions. The primary outcome was objectively-measured weight loss (from baseline) at 3.5 years. Secondary outcomes included changes in self-reported physical activity and diet at 3.5 years. Cost-effectiveness was estimated at 3.5 years and over participants' lifetime. Of 665 men invited, 488 (73%; 65% of the 747 RCT participants) attended 3.5-year measurements. The FFIT-FU-I group sustained a mean weight loss of 2.90 kg (95% CI 1.78, 4.02; p < 0.001) 3.5 years after starting FFIT; 32.2% (75/233) weighed ≥5% less than baseline. The FFIT-FU-C group had lost 2.71 kg (1.65, 3.77; p < 0.001) at the 3.5-year measurements (2.5 years after starting FFIT); 31.8% (81/255) weighed ≥5% less than baseline. There were significant sustained improvements in self-reported physical activity and diet in both groups. The estimated incremental cost-effectiveness of FFIT was £10,700-£15,300 per QALY gained at 3.5 years, and £1790-£2200 over participants' lifetime. Participation in FFIT under research and routine conditions leads to long-term weight loss and improvements in physical activity and diet. Investment in FFIT is likely to be cost-effective as part of obesity management strategies in countries where football is popular. ISRCTN32677491 , 20 October 2011.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 135 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 10%
Researcher 12 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 51 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 20 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 13%
Sports and Recreations 12 9%
Psychology 10 7%
Social Sciences 7 5%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 55 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2020.
All research outputs
#894,133
of 20,981,820 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#353
of 1,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,960
of 296,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,981,820 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,828 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them