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Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters
patent
2 patents

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
164 Mendeley
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Title
Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0640-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Weilin Wang, Shaoyan Xu, Zhigang Ren, Jianwen Jiang, Shusen Zheng

Abstract

The latest high-throughput sequencing technologies show that there are more than 1000 types of microbiota in the human gut. These microbes are not only important to maintain human health, but also closely related to the occurrence and development of various diseases. With the development of transplantation technologies, allogeneic transplantation has become an effective therapy for a variety of end-stage diseases. However, complications after transplantation still restrict its further development. Post-transplantation complications are closely associated with a host's immune system. There is also an interaction between a person's gut microbiota and immune system. Recently, animal and human studies have shown that gut microbial populations and diversity are altered after allogeneic transplantations, such as liver transplantation (LT), small bowel transplantation (SBT), kidney transplantation (KT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTCT). Moreover, when complications, such as infection, rejection and graft versus host disease (GVHD) occur, gut microbial populations and diversity present a significant dysbiosis. Several animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that taking probiotics and prebiotics can effectively regulate gut microbiota and reduce the incidence of complications after transplantation. However, the role of intestinal decontamination in allogeneic transplantation is controversial. This paper reviews gut microbial status after transplantation and its relationship with complications. The role of intervention methods, including antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics, in complications after transplantation are also discussed. Further research in this new field needs to determine the definite relationship between gut microbial dysbiosis and complications after transplantation. Additionally, further research examining gut microbial intervention methods to ameliorate complications after transplantation is warranted. A better understanding of the relationship between gut microbiota and complications after allogeneic transplantation may make gut microbiota as a therapeutic target in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 164 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 161 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 18%
Student > Master 23 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Other 20 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 9%
Other 34 21%
Unknown 22 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 16 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 4%
Other 21 13%
Unknown 34 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2020.
All research outputs
#4,573,438
of 19,338,160 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#667
of 3,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,003
of 248,388 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,338,160 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,388 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them