↓ Skip to main content

Reduction in peripheral vascular resistance predicts improvement in insulin clearance following weight loss

Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Reduction in peripheral vascular resistance predicts improvement in insulin clearance following weight loss
Published in
Cardiovascular Diabetology, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12933-015-0276-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nora E. Straznicky, Mariee T. Grima, Carolina I. Sari, Elisabeth A. Lambert, Sarah E. Phillips, Nina Eikelis, Daisuke Kobayashi, Dagmara Hering, Justin A. Mariani, John B. Dixon, Paul J. Nestel, Sofie Karapanagiotidis, Markus P. Schlaich, Gavin W. Lambert

Abstract

The hyperinsulinemia of obesity is a function of both increased pancreatic insulin secretion and decreased insulin clearance, and contributes to cardiovascular risk. Whilst weight loss is known to enhance insulin clearance, there is a paucity of data concerning the underlying mechanisms. This study was conducted to examine the inter-relationships between changes in sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, vascular function and insulin clearance during a weight loss program. Seventeen non-smoking, un-medicated individuals aged 55 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM), body mass index (BMI) 33.9 ± 1.7 kg/m(2), underwent a 4-month hypocaloric diet (HCD), using a modified Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, whilst seventeen age- and BMI-matched subjects acted as controls. Insulin sensitivity and insulin clearance were assessed via euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (exogenous insulin clearance); hepatic insulin extraction was calculated as fasting C-peptide to insulin ratio (endogenous insulin clearance); SNS activity was quantified by microneurographic nerve recordings of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and whole-body norepinephrine kinetics; and vascular function by calf venous occlusion plethysmography and finger arterial tonometry. Weight loss averaged -8.3 ± 0.6 % of body weight in the HCD group and was accompanied by increased clamp-derived glucose utilization (by 20 ± 9 %, P = 0.04) and exogenous insulin clearance (by 12 ± 5 %, P = 0.02). Hepatic insulin extraction increased from 6.3 ± 0.8 to 7.1 ± 0.9 (P = 0.09). Arterial norepinephrine concentration decreased by -12 ± 5 %, whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate by -14 ± 8 %, and MSNA by -9 ± 5 bursts per 100 heartbeats in the HCD group (P all >0.05 versus control group). Step-wise regression analysis revealed a bidirectional relationship between enhanced exogenous insulin clearance post weight loss and reduction in calf vascular resistance (r = -0.63, P = 0.01) which explained 40 % of the variance. Increase in hepatic insulin extraction was predicted by enhanced finger reactive hyperaemic response (P = 0.006) and improvement in oral glucose tolerance (P = 0.002) which together explained 64 % of the variance. Insulin clearance is independently and reciprocally associated with changes in vascular function during weight loss intervention. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01771042 and NCT00408850.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 119 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 22%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 5%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 31 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 5%
Sports and Recreations 6 5%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 17 14%
Unknown 38 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,598,356
of 5,526,446 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#401
of 476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#155,581
of 194,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#26
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,526,446 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 476 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.