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Anti-malarial prescription practices among children admitted to six public hospitals in Uganda from 2011 to 2013

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
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4 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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53 Mendeley
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Title
Anti-malarial prescription practices among children admitted to six public hospitals in Uganda from 2011 to 2013
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0851-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Asadu Sserwanga, David Sears, Bryan K. Kapella, Ruth Kigozi, Denis Rubahika, Sarah G. Staedke, Moses Kamya, Steven S. Yoon, Michelle A. Chang, Grant Dorsey, Arthur Mpimbaza

Abstract

In 2011, Uganda's Ministry of Health switched policy from presumptive treatment of malaria to recommending parasitological diagnosis prior to treatment, resulting in an expansion of diagnostic services at all levels of public health facilities including hospitals. Despite this change, anti-malarial drugs are often prescribed even when test results are negative. Presented is data on anti-malarial prescription practices among hospitalized children who underwent diagnostic testing after adoption of new treatment guidelines. Anti-malarial prescription practices were collected as part of an inpatient malaria surveillance program generating high quality data among children admitted for any reason at government hospitals in six districts. A standardized medical record form was used to collect detailed patient information including presenting symptoms and signs, laboratory test results, admission and final diagnoses, treatments administered, and final outcome upon discharge. Between July 2011 and December 2013, 58,095 children were admitted to the six hospitals (hospital range 3294-20,426).A total of 56,282 (96.9 %) patients were tested for malaria, of which 26,072 (46.3 %) tested positive (hospital range 5.9-57.3 %). Among those testing positive, only 84 (0.3 %) were first tested after admission and 295 of 30,389 (1.0 %) patients who tested negative at admission later tested positive. Of 30,210 children with only negative test results, 11,977 (39.6 %) were prescribed an anti-malarial (hospital range 14.5-53.6 %). The proportion of children with a negative test result who were prescribed an anti-malarial fluctuated over time and did not show a significant trend at any site with the exception of one hospital where a steady decline was observed. Among those with only negative test results, children 6-12 months of age (aOR 3.78; p < 0.001) and those greater than 12 months of age (aOR 4.89; p < 0.001) were more likely to be prescribed an anti-malarial compared to children less than 6 months of age. Children with findings suggestive of severe malaria were also more likely to be prescribed an anti-malarial after a negative test result (aOR 1.98; p < 0.001). Despite high testing rates for malaria at all sites, prescription of anti-malarials to patients with negative test results remained high, with the exception of one site where a steady decline occurred.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 25%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Postgraduate 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,879,755
of 7,159,230 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,178
of 2,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,303
of 226,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#77
of 134 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,159,230 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,402 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 134 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.