↓ Skip to main content

The association of body mass index with difficult tracheal intubation management by direct laryngoscopy: a meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Anesthesiology, June 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The association of body mass index with difficult tracheal intubation management by direct laryngoscopy: a meta-analysis
Published in
BMC Anesthesiology, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12871-018-0534-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tingting Wang, Shen Sun, Shaoqiang Huang

Abstract

Obesity is a serious disorder and may bring about many difficulties of perioperative management. A systematic review was conducted to assess the association between obesity and difficult intubation. We searched electronic databases for related reviews and references of meta-analyses on August 14, 2017. The databases of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane controlled trials register were searched compared obese with non-obese patients in which difficult intubation rate of the adult population were retrieved. Patients with a BMI ≥ 30 kg·m- 2 were considered obese. The primary outcome was difficult tracheal intubation; secondary outcomes were the rates of difficult laryngoscopy and Mallampati score ≥ 3. This review included papers published from 1998 to 2015. This review included 204,303 participants in 16 studies. There was a statistically significant association between obesity and risk of difficult tracheal intubation (pooled RR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.16-3.59, p = 0.01; I2 = 71%, p = 0.008, Power = 1.0). It also showed significantly association between obesity and risk of difficult laryngoscopy (pooled RR = 1.54, 95% CI: 1.25-1.89, p < 0.0001; I2 = 45%, p = 0.07, Power = 1.0), obesity and risk of Mallampati score ≥ 3 (pooled RR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.24-2.69, p = 0.002; I2 = 81%, p < 0.00001, Power = 0.93). However, there were no association of obesity and risks of difficult intubation compared with non-obesity in the cohort studies (pooled RR = 3.41, 95% CI: 0.88-13.23, p = 0.08; I2 = 50%, p = 0.14) and the elective tracheal intubation (pooled RR = 2.31, 95% CI: 0.76-6.99, p = 0.14; I2 = 73%, p = 0.01), no associated with an increased risk of difficult laryngoscopy in the sniffing position (pooled RR = 2.00, 95% CI: 0.97-4.15, p = 0.06; I2 = 67%, p = 0.03). Obesity was associated with an increased risk of difficult intubation, difficult laryngoscopy and Mallampati score ≥ 3 in adults patients undergoing general surgical procedures. However, there were no association of obesity and risks of difficult intubation compared with non-obesity in the cohort studies and the elective tracheal intubation, no associated with an increased risk of difficult laryngoscopy in the sniffing position. Future analyses should explore the association of BMI and difficult airway.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Postgraduate 7 10%
Other 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 24 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 44%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 25 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,068,838
of 13,171,980 outputs
Outputs from BMC Anesthesiology
#458
of 795 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,218
of 268,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Anesthesiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,171,980 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 795 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,353 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them