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A randomised controlled trial of the effect of providing online risk information and lifestyle advice for the most common preventable cancers: study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
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Title
A randomised controlled trial of the effect of providing online risk information and lifestyle advice for the most common preventable cancers: study protocol
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5712-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliet A. Usher-Smith, Golnessa Masson, Katie Mills, Stephen J. Sharp, Stephen Sutton, William M. P. Klein, Simon J. Griffin

Abstract

Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Prevention is recognised by many, including the World Health Organization, to offer the most cost-effective long-term strategy for the control of cancer. One approach that focuses on individuals is the provision of personalised risk information. However, whether such information motivates behaviour change and whether the effect is different with varying formats of risk presentation is unclear. We aim to assess the short-term effect of providing information about personalised risk of cancer in three different formats alongside lifestyle advice on health-related behaviours, risk perception and risk conviction. In a parallel group, randomised controlled trial 1000 participants will be recruited through the online platform Prolific. Participants will be allocated to either a control group receiving cancer-specific lifestyle advice alone or one of three intervention groups receiving the same lifestyle advice alongside their estimated 10-year risk of developing one of the five most common preventable cancers, calculated from self-reported modifiable behavioural risk factors, in one of three different formats (bar chart, pictograph or qualitative scale). The primary outcome is change from baseline in computed risk relative to an individual with a recommended lifestyle at three months. Secondary outcomes include: perceived risk of cancer; anxiety; cancer-related worry; intention to change behaviour; and awareness of cancer risk factors. This study will provide evidence on the short-term effect of providing online information about personalised risk of cancer alongside lifestyle advice on risk perception and health-related behaviours and inform the development of interventions. ISRCTN17450583. Registered 30 January 2018.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 14%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 5%
Mathematics 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 13 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2022.
All research outputs
#3,384,836
of 21,308,069 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,756
of 13,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,880
of 296,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,308,069 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,801 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,938 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.