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Increased exposure to acute thermal stress is associated with a non-linear increase in recombination frequency and an independent linear decrease in fitness in Drosophila

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, August 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Increased exposure to acute thermal stress is associated with a non-linear increase in recombination frequency and an independent linear decrease in fitness in Drosophila
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0452-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Savannah Jackson, Dahlia M. Nielsen, Nadia D. Singh

Abstract

Meiotic recombination rate has long been known to be phenotypically plastic. How plastic recombination evolves and is maintained remains controversial; though a leading model for the evolution of plastic recombination rests on the tenet that organismal fitness and recombination frequency are negatively correlated. Motivated by the mounting evidence that meiotic recombination frequencies increase in response to stress, here we test for a negative correlation between fitness and recombination frequency. Specifically, the fitness-associated recombination model (FAR) predicts that if stress increases meiotic recombination frequency, then increasing exposure to stressful conditions will yield an increasing magnitude of the recombinational response, while concomitantly decreasing fitness. We use heat shock as a stressor to test this prediction in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that increased exposure to heat shock conditions is associated with a non-linear increase in meiotic recombination frequency. We also find an independent effect of heat shock on organismal fitness, with fitness decreasing with increased duration of thermal stress. Our results thus support the foundation of the FAR model for the evolution of plastic recombination. Our data also suggest that modulating recombination frequency is one mechanism by which organisms can rapidly respond to environmental cues and confer increased adaptive potential to their offspring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 24 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 36%
Researcher 4 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Mathematics 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,174,010
of 6,386,702 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#955
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,132
of 196,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#35
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,386,702 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 65th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.