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Declining functional connectivity and changing hub locations in Alzheimer’s disease: an EEG study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, August 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

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1 news outlet
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1 tweeter

Citations

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81 Dimensions

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186 Mendeley
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Title
Declining functional connectivity and changing hub locations in Alzheimer’s disease: an EEG study
Published in
BMC Neurology, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12883-015-0400-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marjolein MA Engels, Cornelis J. Stam, Wiesje M. van der Flier, Philip Scheltens, Hanneke de Waal, Elisabeth CW van Straaten

Abstract

EEG studies have shown that patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have weaker functional connectivity than controls, especially in higher frequency bands. Furthermore, active regions seem more prone to AD pathology. How functional connectivity is affected in AD subgroups of disease severity and how network hubs (highly connected brain areas) change is not known. We compared AD patients with different disease severity and controls in terms of functional connections, hub strength and hub location. We studied routine 21-channel resting-state electroencephalography (EEG) of 318 AD patients (divided into tertiles based on disease severity: mild, moderate and severe AD) and 133 age-matched controls. Functional connectivity between EEG channels was estimated with the Phase Lag Index (PLI). From the PLI-based connectivity matrix, the minimum spanning tree (MST) was derived. For each node (EEG channel) in the MST, the betweenness centrality (BC) was computed, a measure to quantify the relative importance of a node within the network. Then we derived color-coded head plots based on BC values and calculated the center of mass (the exact middle had x and y values of 0). A shifting of the hub locations was defined as a shift of the center of mass on the y-axis across groups. Multivariate general linear models with PLI or BC values as dependent variables and the groups as continuous variables were used in the five conventional frequency bands. We found that functional connectivity decreases with increasing disease severity in the alpha band. All, except for posterior, regions showed increasing BC values with increasing disease severity. The center of mass shifted from posterior to more anterior regions with increasing disease severity in the higher frequency bands, indicating a loss of relative functional importance of the posterior brain regions. In conclusion, we observed decreasing functional connectivity in the posterior regions, together with a shifted hub location from posterior to central regions with increasing AD severity. Relative hub strength decreases in posterior regions while other regions show a relative rise with increasing AD severity, which is in accordance with the activity-dependent degeneration theory. Our results indicate that hubs are disproportionally affected in AD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Singapore 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 181 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 23%
Student > Master 30 16%
Researcher 30 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 9%
Professor 10 5%
Other 30 16%
Unknown 28 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 41 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 13%
Engineering 23 12%
Psychology 18 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 8%
Other 23 12%
Unknown 42 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 September 2015.
All research outputs
#1,959,418
of 15,432,069 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#254
of 1,754 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,064
of 240,564 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,432,069 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,754 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,564 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them