↓ Skip to main content

Care–physical activity initiatives in the neighbourhood: study protocol for mixed-methods research on participation, effective elements, impact, and funding methods

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
63 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Care–physical activity initiatives in the neighbourhood: study protocol for mixed-methods research on participation, effective elements, impact, and funding methods
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5715-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annemarie Wagemakers, Lisanne S. Mulderij, Kirsten T. Verkooijen, Stef Groenewoud, Maria A. Koelen

Abstract

In the Netherlands, people with a low socioeconomic status (SES) live approximately 6 years less and are less engaged in physical activity (PA) than high SES citizens. This contributes to the persistent health inequalities between low and high SES citizens. Care-PA initiatives are deemed effective for stimulating PA and improving health and participation among peoples with a low SES. In those initiatives, multiple sectors (e.g. sports, health insurers, municipalities) collaborate to connect primary care and PA at neighbourhood level. This study focuses on two Dutch municipalities that aim to invest in Health in All Policies (HiAP) and care-PA initiatives to improve the health of people with low SES. The aim is to gain insight into (1) the short-term (3 months) and long-term (1 year) outcomes of participating in care-PA initiatives for low SES citizens in terms of health, quality of life, and societal participation, (2) the effective elements that contribute to these outcomes, (3) the direct and perceived societal costs and benefits of care-PA initiatives, and (4) alternative ways to fund integrated care, prevention, and care-PA initiatives at neighbourhood level. The study will be built on a mixed-methods design guided by action research to continuously facilitate participatory processes and practical solutions. To assess outcomes, body measurements and questionnaires will be used as part of a pre-test/post-test design. Focus groups and interviews will be conducted to gain an in-depth understanding of outcomes and action elements. Action elements will be explored by using multiple tools: concept mapping, the logic model, and capacity mapping. Direct and perceived societal costs will be measured by administrative data from healthcare insurers (before-after design) and the effectiveness arena. An alternative funding model will be identified based on literature study, expert meetings, and municipal workshops. Initiatives addressing multiple factors at different levels in an integral way are a challenge for evaluation. Multi-methods and tools are required, and data need to be interpreted comprehensively in order to contribute to a contextual insight into what works and why in relation to HiAP and care-PA initiatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 63 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 63 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Researcher 8 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 6%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 14 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 17 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 10%
Psychology 4 6%
Sports and Recreations 4 6%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 14 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2018.
All research outputs
#8,355,592
of 15,922,938 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,392
of 10,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,336
of 278,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,938 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,953 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.