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A different entity: a population based study of characteristics and recurrence patterns in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, August 2015
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  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 164)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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23 Mendeley
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Title
A different entity: a population based study of characteristics and recurrence patterns in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas
Published in
Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40463-015-0082-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott Murray, Michael N. Ha, Kara Thompson, Robert D. Hart, Murali Rajaraman, Stephanie L. Snow

Abstract

Cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx were compared with other head and neck cancer (HNC) anatomic subsites in patients treated at the provincial referral centre for HNC, the Nova Scotia Cancer Centre (NSCC). A retrospective chart review was performed on HNC patients assessed at the NSCC between 2010 and 2011. Patient demographics, disease characteristics, treatment details and outcomes, including recurrence rates and survival were collected. Data was collected on new and recurrent cases of HNC. This data was compared between the two types of HNC using chi-square tests for dichotomous categorical variables or Fishers exact test where appropriate. Wald test was used to compare categorical variables with 3 categories. Continuous variables were compared using the non-parametric Wilcoxon test. 318 charts were included in the analysis. 122 (38 %) were oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs). In terms of disease characteristics, OPSCCs were more likely to be poorly differentiated/undifferentiated (n = 267, 49(40 %) vs 42(21 %), p < 0.001), non-keratinizing (n = 169, 25(20 %) vs 17(9 %), p < 0.001), greater than 2 cm (n = 253, 72(59 %) vs 78(40 %), p = 0.0061), stage 4 (n = 313, 55(45 %) vs 64(33 %), p = 0.0315) and have had locoregional nodal spread (n = 315, 103(84 %) vs 55(28 %), p < 0.001). In the subset of 57 patients that had p16 testing, OPSCCs were more likely to be p16(+) (37(30 %) vs 1(1 %), p < .001). There were no significant differences in terms of Charlson probability of 10 year survival, smoking or alcohol consumption although OPSCC patients were significantly less likely to have COPD as a co-morbidity (n = 318, 19(16 %) vs 53(27 %), p = 0.0175). Finally, OPSCCs had less chance for relapse than non-OPSCCs in both univariate (2.119 times less, p=0.0034) and multivariate (1.899 times less, p=0.0505) analyses along with a 1.822 times less overall mortality in a multivariae analysis (p=0.0408).  CONCLUSIONS: This analysis suggests that Nova Scotian OPSCCs should be considered distinct from other HNC lesions, most notably in terms of disease characteristics and prognosis. Specifically, despite a higher association with disease factors traditionally considered to be linked to poor prognosis, outcomes were actually superior in terms of relapse and overall mortality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 35%
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 52%
Unspecified 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,945,261
of 5,560,729 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#48
of 164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,632
of 194,919 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery
#4
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,560,729 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 164 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,919 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.