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Risk factors for hospitalized patients with resistant or multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

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70 Dimensions

Readers on

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200 Mendeley
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Title
Risk factors for hospitalized patients with resistant or multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13756-018-0370-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gowri Raman, Esther E. Avendano, Jeffrey Chan, Sanjay Merchant, Laura Puzniak

Abstract

Identifying risk factors predicting acquisition of resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa will aid surveillance and diagnostic initiatives and can be crucial in early and appropriate antibiotic therapy. We conducted a systematic review examining risk factors of acquisition of resistant P. aeruginosa among hospitalized patients. MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, and Cochrane Central were searched between 2000 and 2016 for studies examining independent risk factors associated with acquisition of resistant P. aeruginosa, among hospitalized patients. Random effects model meta-analysis was conducted when at least three or more studies were sufficiently similar. Of the 54 eligible articles, 28 publications (31studies) examined multi-drug resistant (MDR) or extensively drug resistant (XDR) P. aeruginosa and 26 publications (29 studies) examined resistant P. aeruginosa. The acquisition of MDR P. aeruginosa, as compared with non-MDR P. aeruginosa, was significantly associated with intensive care unit (ICU) admission (3 studies: summary adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.2) or use of quinolones (4 studies: summary adjusted OR 3.59). Acquisition of MDR or XDR compared with susceptible P. aeruginosa was significantly associated with prior hospital stay (4 studies: summary adjusted OR 1.90), use of quinolones (3 studies: summary adjusted OR 4.34), or use of carbapenems (3 studies: summary adjusted OR 13.68). The acquisition of MDR P. aeruginosa compared with non-P. aeruginosa was significantly associated with prior use of cephalosporins (3 studies: summary adjusted OR 3.96), quinolones (4 studies: summary adjusted OR 2.96), carbapenems (6 studies: summary adjusted OR 2.61), and prior hospital stay (4 studies: summary adjusted OR 1.74). The acquisition of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa compared with susceptible P. aeruginosa, was statistically significantly associated with prior use of piperacillin-tazobactam (3 studies: summary adjusted OR 2.64), vancomycin (3 studies: summary adjusted OR 1.76), and carbapenems (7 studies: summary adjusted OR 4.36). Prior use of antibiotics and prior hospital or ICU stay was the most significant risk factors for acquisition of resistant P. aeruginosa. These findings provide guidance in identifying patients that may be at an elevated risk for a resistant infection and emphasize the importance of antimicrobial stewardship and infection control in hospitals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 200 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 16%
Researcher 24 12%
Student > Bachelor 23 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 10%
Other 17 9%
Other 27 14%
Unknown 58 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 45 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 23 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 15 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 6%
Other 18 9%
Unknown 68 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,133,255
of 20,842,105 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#123
of 1,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,083
of 295,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,842,105 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,176 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,557 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them