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Avoiding exercise mediates the effects of internalized and experienced weight stigma on physical activity in the years following bariatric surgery

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Avoiding exercise mediates the effects of internalized and experienced weight stigma on physical activity in the years following bariatric surgery
Published in
BMC Obesity, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40608-018-0195-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

SeungYong Han, Gina Agostini, Alexandra A. Brewis, Amber Wutich

Abstract

People living with severe obesity report high levels of weight-related stigma. Theoretically, this stigma undermines weight loss efforts. The objective of this study is to test one proposed mechanism to explain why weight loss is so difficult once an individual becomes obese: that weight-related stigma inhibits physical activity via demotivation to exercise. The study focused on individuals who had bariatric surgery within the past 5 years (N = 298) and who report a post-surgical body mass index (BMI) ranging from 16 to 70. Exercise avoidance motivation (EAM) and physical activity (PA) were modeled as latent variables using structural equation modeling. Two measures of weight stigma, the Stigmatizing Situations Inventory (SSI) and the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) were modified for people with a long history of extreme obesity for use as observed predictors. Exercise avoidance motivation (EAM) significantly mediated the association between both experienced (SSI) and internalized (WBIS) weight stigma and physical activity (PA) in this population. Exercise avoidance motivation, influenced by weight stigma, may be a significant factor explaining the positive relationship between higher body weights with lower levels of physical activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 19%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Other 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 10 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Sports and Recreations 5 9%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 16 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2019.
All research outputs
#4,580,877
of 15,606,212 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#76
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,097
of 276,441 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,606,212 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,441 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them