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“We don’t want our clothes to smell smoke”: changing malaria control practices and opportunities for integrated community-based management in Baringo, Kenya

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2018
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116 Mendeley
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Title
“We don’t want our clothes to smell smoke”: changing malaria control practices and opportunities for integrated community-based management in Baringo, Kenya
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5513-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacinter A. Amadi, Daniel O. Olago, George O. Ong’amo, Silas O. Oriaso, Isaac K. Nyamongo, Benson B. A. Estambale

Abstract

The decline in global malaria cases is attributed to intensified utilization of primary vector control interventions and artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). These strategies are inadequate in many rural areas, thus adopting locally appropriate integrated malaria control strategies is imperative in these heterogeneous settings. This study aimed at investigating trends and local knowledge on malaria and to develop a framework for malaria control for communities in Baringo, Kenya. Clinical malaria cases obtained from four health facilities in the riverine and lowland zones were used to analyse malaria trends for the 2005-2014 period. A mixed method approach integrating eight focus group discussions, 12 key informant interviews, 300 survey questionnaires and two stakeholders' consultative forums were used to assess local knowledge on malaria risk and develop a framework for malaria reduction. Malaria cases increased significantly during the 2005-2014 period (tau = 0.352; p < 0.001) in the riverine zone. March, April, May, June and October showed significant increases compared to other months. Misconceptions about the cause and mode of malaria transmission existed. Gender-segregated outdoor occupation such as social drinking, farm activities, herding, and circumcision events increased the risk of mosquito bites. A positive relationship occurred between education level and opinion on exposure to malaria risk after dusk (χ2 = 2.70, p < 0.05). There was over-reliance on bed nets, yet only 68% (204/300) of respondents owned at least one net. Complementary malaria control measures were under-utilized, with 90% of respondents denying having used either sprays, repellents or burnt cow dung or plant leaves over the last one year before the study was conducted. Baraza, radios, and mobile phone messages were identified as effective media for malaria information exchange. Supplementary strategies identified included unblocking canals, clearing Prosopis bushes, and use of community volunteers and school clubs to promote social behaviour change. The knowledge gap on malaria transmission should be addressed to minimize the impacts and enhance uptake of appropriate malaria management mechanisms. Implementing community-based framework can support significant reductions in malaria prevalence by minimizing both indoor and outdoor malaria transmissions.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 116 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 20%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 23 20%
Unknown 22 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 11%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 4%
Other 31 27%
Unknown 28 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#11,701,831
of 13,177,477 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#8,478
of 9,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,635
of 268,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,177,477 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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