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A qualitative interview study on the positive well-being of medical school faculty in their teaching role: job demands, job resources and role interaction

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, September 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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103 Mendeley
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Title
A qualitative interview study on the positive well-being of medical school faculty in their teaching role: job demands, job resources and role interaction
Published in
BMC Research Notes, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1393-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. W. van den Berg, C. P. M. Verberg, J. J. Berkhout, M. J. M. H. Lombarts, A. J. J. A. Scherpbier, A. D. C. Jaarsma

Abstract

Attention for the well-being of medical school faculty is not only important for the prevention of attrition and burnout, but may also boost performance in their tasks in medical education. Positive well-being can be conceptualized as work engagement and this is associated with increased performance. In this study we explore how demands and resources from different tasks affect work engagement specifically for education. Between June and September 2013, we conducted a multisite semi-structured interview study with a diverse group of medical school faculty and used an open-coding strategy within the Work Engagement Model on the transcribed interviews. We interviewed 16 faculty members whose teaching experience ranged from 7 to 38 years and whose professional tasks ranged from being solely an educator to being a physician, researcher, educator and administrator simultaneously. All participants were clear on the perceived demands and resources, although similar aspects of the work environment could be perceived oppositely between participants. Overarching themes were perceptions related to the organization or department, often described as a general and long-term effect and perceptions directly related to a task, often described as a direct and short-term effect on well-being. Furthermore, the demands and resources as resultant of fulfilling multiple tasks were described clearly by participants. The ambiguous nature of the work environment in terms of demands and resources requires an individualized approach to supporting work engagement. Furthermore, faculty members perceive many resources from fulfilling multiple tasks in relation to their tasks in education. Faculty developers and administrators alike could use these findings to apply the concept of work engagement to their daily support of faculty in medical education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 103 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Other 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 21 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 23%
Psychology 14 14%
Social Sciences 12 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 9%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 25 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,104,255
of 6,298,319 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#492
of 1,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,295
of 194,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#29
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,298,319 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,757 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,841 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.