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Correlates of metabolic syndrome among young Brazilian adolescents population

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, July 2018
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Title
Correlates of metabolic syndrome among young Brazilian adolescents population
Published in
Nutrition Journal, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12937-018-0371-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michel Coutinho dos Santos, Ana Paula Cicci de Castro Coutinho, Mônica de Souza Dantas, Letícia Ayran Medina Yabunaka, Dartagnan Pinto Guedes, Silvia Aparecida Oesterreich

Abstract

Findings available in literature indicate that metabolic syndrome (MetS) diagnosed in young ages tends to remain in adulthood. The aim of the study was to identify demographic, nutritional, anthropometric and behavioral correlates of MetS in a sample of adolescents from Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. This is a cross-sectional school-based study involving 274 participants aged 12-18 years (186 girls and 88 boys). Anthropometric measurements were performed and a questionnaire with structured questions was applied for data collection. MetS was identified according to criteria proposed by the International Diabetes Federation. Data were statistically treated using bivariate analysis and hierarchical multiple regression. The proportion of adolescents identified with MetS was equivalent to 4.7% [95% CI (3.6-6.0)]. Multivariate analysis showed that older age (OR = 1.22 [1.04-1.73]) and higher economic class (OR = 1.25 [1.07-1.96]) were significantly associated with MetS. Among behavioral factors, longer recreational screen time (OR = 1.26 [1.05-1.94]) and low fruits/vegetables intake (OR = 1.49 [1.23-2.41]) were independently associated with MetS. Likewise, excess body weight (OR = 1.52 [1.24-2.41]) was significantly associated with the outcome. The high proportion of adolescents with MetS and the identification of their correlates reinforce the need for early life style intervention and awareness programs in this population group.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 20%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Librarian 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 26 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Sports and Recreations 4 6%
Psychology 3 4%
Unspecified 3 4%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 31 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2019.
All research outputs
#11,704,118
of 14,759,386 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#1,029
of 1,145 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,554
of 272,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,759,386 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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