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Large scale transcriptome analysis reveals interplay between development of forest trees and a beneficial mycorrhiza helper bacterium

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, September 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

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12 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Large scale transcriptome analysis reveals interplay between development of forest trees and a beneficial mycorrhiza helper bacterium
Published in
BMC Genomics, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12864-015-1856-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Florence Kurth, Lasse Feldhahn, Markus Bönn, Sylvie Herrmann, François Buscot, Mika T. Tarkka

Abstract

Pedunculate oak, Quercus robur is an abundant forest tree species that hosts a large and diverse community of beneficial ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMFs), whereby ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation is stimulated by mycorrhiza helper bacteria such as Streptomyces sp. AcH 505. Oaks typically grow rhythmically, with alternating root flushes (RFs) and shoot flushes (SFs). We explored the poorly understood mechanisms by which oaks integrate signals induced by their beneficial microbes and endogenous rhythmic growth at the level of gene expression. To this end, we compared transcript profiles of oak microcuttings at RF and SF during interactions with AcH 505 alone and in combination with the basidiomycetous EMF Piloderma croceum. The local root and distal leaf responses to the microorganisms differed substantially. More genes involved in the recognition of bacteria and fungi, defence and cell wall remodelling related transcription factors (TFs) were differentially expressed in the roots than in the leaves of oaks. In addition, interaction with AcH 505 and P. croceum affected the expression of a higher number of genes during SF than during RF, including AcH 505 elicited defence response, which was attenuated by co-inoculation with P. croceum in the roots during SF. Genes encoding leucine-rich receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) and proteins (LRR-RLPs), LRR containing defence response regulators, TFs from bZIP, ERF and WRKY families, xyloglucan cell wall transglycolases/hydrolases and exordium proteins were differentially expressed in both roots and leaves of plants treated with AcH 505. Only few genes, including specific RLKs and TFs, were induced in both AcH 505 and co-inoculation treatments. Treatment with AcH 505 induces and maintains the expression levels of signalling genes encoding candidate receptor protein kinases and TFs and leads to differential expression of cell wall modification related genes in pedunculate oak microcuttings. Local gene expression response to AcH 505 alone and in combination with P. croceum are more pronounced when roots are in resting stages, possibly due to the fact that non growing roots re-direct their activity towards plant defence rather than growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 28%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 56%
Environmental Science 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Engineering 2 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2016.
All research outputs
#3,132,949
of 16,183,527 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,526
of 8,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,457
of 241,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,183,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,958 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,810 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them