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Disease flares in rheumatoid arthritis are associated with joint damage progression and disability: 10-year results from the BeSt study

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, August 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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2 tweeters

Citations

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57 Dimensions

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Disease flares in rheumatoid arthritis are associated with joint damage progression and disability: 10-year results from the BeSt study
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0730-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Iris M. Markusse, Linda Dirven, Andreas H. Gerards, Johannes H L M van Groenendael, H. Karel Ronday, Pit J S M Kerstens, Willem F. Lems, Tom W J Huizinga, Cornelia F. Allaart

Abstract

Flares in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are suggested to sometimes spontaneously resolve. Targeted therapy could then entail possible overtreatment. We aimed to determine the flare prevalence in patients who are treated-to-target and to evaluate associations between flares and patient-reported outcomes and radiographic progression. In the BeSt study, 508 patients were treated-to-target for 10 years. After initial treatment adjustments to achieve disease activity score ≤2.4, a flare was defined from the second year of follow-up onwards, according to three definitions. The first definition is a disease activity score >2.4 with an increase of ≥0.6 regardless of the previous disease activity score. The other definitions will be described in the manuscript. The flare prevalence was 4-11 % per visit; 67 % of the patients experienced ≥1 flare during 9 years of treatment (median 0 per patient per year). During a flare, functional ability decreased with a mean difference of 0.25 in health assessment questionnaire (p < 0.001), and the odds ratios (95 % confidence intervals) for an increase in patients' assessment of disease activity, pain and morning stiffness of ≥20 mm on a visual analogue scale were 8.5 (7.3-9.8), 8.4 (7.2-9.7) and 5.6 (4.8-6.6), respectively, compared to the absence of a flare. The odds ratio for radiographic progression was 1.7 (1.1-2.8) in a year with a flare compared to a year without a flare. The more flares a patient experienced, the higher the health assessment questionnaire at year 10 (p < 0.001) and the more radiographic progression from baseline to year 10 (p = 0.005). Flares were associated with concurrent increase in patient's assessment of disease activity, pain and morning stiffness, functional deterioration and development of radiographic progression with a dose-response-effect, both during the flare and long term. This suggests that intensifying treatment during a flare outweighs the risk of possible overtreatment. Dutch trial registry NTR262 (7 September 2005) and NTR265 (8 September 2005).

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Ireland 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 57 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 13%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Master 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 18 30%
Unknown 6 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Computer Science 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2017.
All research outputs
#2,189,028
of 17,886,933 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#510
of 2,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,306
of 246,648 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,886,933 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,628 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,648 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them