↓ Skip to main content

Alcohol-based surgical hand preparation: translating scientific evidence into clinical practice

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, July 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Alcohol-based surgical hand preparation: translating scientific evidence into clinical practice
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13756-018-0372-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gilberto G. Gaspar, Mayra G. Menegueti, Ana Elisa R. Lopes, Roberto O. C. Santos, Thamiris R. de Araújo, Aline Nassiff, Lécio R. Ferreira, Maria Eulalia L. V. Dallora, Silvia R. M. S. Canini, Fernando Bellissimo-Rodrigues

Abstract

Although alcohol-based surgical hand preparation offers potential advantages over the traditional surgical scrubbing technique, implementing it may be challenging due to resistance of surgeons in changing their practice. We aimed to implement alcohol-based surgical hand preparation in the hospital setting evaluating the impact of that on the quality and duration of the procedure, as well as on the prevention of surgical site infections. A quasi-experimental study conducted at a tertiary-care university hospital from April 01 to November 01, 2017. Participants were cardiac and orthopedic surgical teams (n = 56) and patients operated by them (n = 231). Intervention consisted of making alcohol-based handrub available in the operating room, convincing and training surgical teams for using it, promoting direct observation of surgical hand preparation, and providing aggregated feedback on the quality of the preparation. The primary study outcome was the quality of the surgical hand preparation, inferred by the compliance with each one of the steps predicted in the World Health Organization (WHO) technique, evaluated through direct observation. Secondary study outcome was the patient's individual probability of developing surgical site infection in both study periods. We used the Wilcoxon for paired samples and McNemar's test to assess the primary study outcome and we build a logistic regression model to assess the secondary outcome. We observed 534 surgical hand preparation events. Among 33 participants with full data available for both study periods, we observed full compliance with all the steps predicted in the WHO technique in 0.03% (1/33) of them in the pre-intervention period and in 36.36% (12/33) of them in the intervention period (OR:12.0, 95% CI: 2. 4-59.2, p = 0.002). Compared to the pre-intervention period, the intervention reduced the duration of the preparation (4.8 min vs 2.7 min, respectively; p < 0.001). The individual risk of developing a surgical site infection did not significantly change between the pre-intervention and the intervention phase (Adjusted RR = 0.66; 95% CI 0. 16-2.70, p = 0.563). Our results demonstrate that, when compared to the traditional surgical scrub, alcohol-based surgical hand preparation improves the quality and reduces the duration of the preparation, being at least equally effective for the prevention of surgical site infections.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 23%
Student > Postgraduate 8 11%
Student > Master 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 16 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 19 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 21%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 6%
Psychology 3 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2018.
All research outputs
#990,372
of 15,922,988 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#131
of 905 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,598
of 277,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,988 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 905 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them