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Modelling the association between fibrinogen concentration on admission and mortality in patients with massive transfusion after severe trauma: an analysis of a large regional database

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Modelling the association between fibrinogen concentration on admission and mortality in patients with massive transfusion after severe trauma: an analysis of a large regional database
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13049-018-0523-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pierre Bouzat, François-Xavier Ageron, Jonathan Charbit, Xavier Bobbia, Pauline Deras, Jennifer Bas Dit Nugues, Etienne Escudier, Guillaume Marcotte, Marc Leone, Jean-Stéphane David

Abstract

The relationship between fibrinogen concentration and traumatic death has been poorly explored after severe trauma. Existing studies analysed this relationship in unselected trauma population, often considering fibrinogen concentration as a categorical variable. The aim of our study was to model the relationship between fibrinogen concentration and in-hospital mortality in severe trauma patients requiring massive transfusion using fibrinogen on admission as a continuous variable. We designed a retrospective observational study based on prospectively collected data from 2009 to 2015 in seven French level-I trauma centres. All consecutive patients requiring a transfusion of at least 10 packed red blood cells (RBC) within 24 h were included. To assess the relationship between in-hospital death and fibrinogen concentration on admission, we performed generalized linear and additive models with death as a dependent variable. We also assessed the relationship between fibrinogen concentration below 1.5 g.L- 1 and potential predictors. Within the study period, 366 patients were included. A non-linear relationship was found between fibrinogen concentration and death. Graphical modelling of this relationship depicted a negative association between fibrinogen levels and death below a fibrinogen concentration of 1.5 g.L- 1. Predictors of low fibrinogen concentration (< 1.5 g.L- 1) were systolic blood pressure, Glasgow coma scale and haemoglobin concentration on admission. A complex and robust approach for modelling the relationship between fibrinogen and mortality revealed a critical fibrinogen threshold of 1.5 g.L- 1 for severe trauma patients requiring massive transfusion. This trigger may guide the administration of procoagulant therapies in this context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Mathematics 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2018.
All research outputs
#1,622,956
of 15,220,640 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#164
of 934 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,098
of 274,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,220,640 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 934 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them