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Dual task effect on postural control in patients with degenerative cerebellar disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebellum & Ataxias, May 2015
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Title
Dual task effect on postural control in patients with degenerative cerebellar disorders
Published in
Cerebellum & Ataxias, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40673-015-0025-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heike Jacobi, Juliane Alfes, Martina Minnerop, Jürgen Konczak, Thomas Klockgether, Dagmar Timmann

Abstract

The cerebellum plays an important role for balance control and the coordination of voluntary movements. Beyond that there is growing evidence that the cerebellum is also involved in cognitive functions. How ataxic motor symptoms are influenced by simultaneous performance of a cognitive task, however, has rarely been assessed and some of the findings are contradictory. We assessed stance in 20 patients with adult onset degenerative almost purely cerebellar disorders and 20 healthy controls during single and dual task conditions (verbal working memory task). To objectively measure postural sway and the impact of somatosensory, visual and vestibular inputs we used static and dynamic posturography with the Sensory Organization Test (SOT). In both groups, cerebellar patients and controls, dual tasking reduced all sway parameters. Reduction of sway path was higher in cerebellar patients and increased with the difficulty of the postural task. The frequency of falls was higher in the patients group especially during the more challenging conditions and dual task performance in particular increased the risk of falls in cerebellar patients. Dual task conditions had a larger impact on sway parameters in patients with chronic cerebellar disorders than in healthy controls and lead to an increased risk of falls. As performing two tasks simultaneously is common and therefore important in daily life dual task exercises should be part of physical therapy programs for cerebellar patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 71 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Other 7 10%
Researcher 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Other 19 26%
Unknown 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 15%
Neuroscience 9 13%
Psychology 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 23 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 September 2015.
All research outputs
#13,294,568
of 15,052,648 outputs
Outputs from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#71
of 81 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,143
of 240,736 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebellum & Ataxias
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,052,648 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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