↓ Skip to main content

Ethnicity and neighbourhood deprivation determines the response rate in sexual dysfunction surveys

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, September 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Ethnicity and neighbourhood deprivation determines the response rate in sexual dysfunction surveys
Published in
BMC Research Notes, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1387-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lasantha S. Malavige, Pabasi Wijesekara, Dhanesha Seneviratne Epa, Priyanga Ranasinghe, Jonathan C. Levy

Abstract

Self-administered questionnaires provide a better alternative to disclose sensitive information in sexual health research. We describe the factors that determine the positive response (initial recruitment) to an initial invitation and subsequent completion of study to a postal questionnaire on sexual dysfunction. South Asians (SA) and Europids with and without diabetes (DM) were recruited from GP clinics in UK. Men who returned the properly filled consent form ('recruited-group') were sent the questionnaire and those who returned it were considered as the 'completed-group'. Index of Multiple Deprivation Scores (IMDs) were generated using UK postcodes. We calculated the recruitment rate and completion rate of the recruited and the study-completed groups respectively. Total approached sample was 9100 [DM: 2914 (32 %), SA: 4563 (50.1 %)]. Recruitment rate was 8.8 % and was higher in Europids and in patients with DM. Mean IMDs for the recruited group was 20.9 ± 11.9, and it was higher among recruited SA compared to Europids (p < 0.001). Mean IMDs was higher in the recruited group compared to non-recruited (p < 0.01). All four recruited groups (SA/Europid and DM/non-DM) had lower IMDs compared to non-recruited. Completion rate was 71.5 % (n 544) (SA: 62.3 %, Europids: 77.4 %; p < 0.05). Recruitment for postal sexual health surveys is positively influenced by presence of investigated disease, older age, being from lesser deprived areas and Europid ethnicity. Furthermore, Europids were more likely to complete survey than South Asians irrespective of disease status.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Researcher 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 22%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2016.
All research outputs
#3,251,492
of 7,879,571 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#632
of 1,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,035
of 230,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#40
of 153 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,879,571 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,929 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 153 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.