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Alcohol consumption among pregnant women in Northern Tanzania 2000–2010: a registry-based study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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134 Mendeley
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Title
Alcohol consumption among pregnant women in Northern Tanzania 2000–2010: a registry-based study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0630-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Blaauw Isaksen, Truls Østbye, Blandina Theophil Mmbaga, Anne Kjersti Daltveit

Abstract

Alcohol can be harmful to the development of the foetus. In most developed countries, pregnant women are recommended to abstain from alcohol, however in developing countries, women are less likely to receive these recommendations. With respect to pregnant women in Northern Tanzania, this study aims to 1) describe time trends in level of alcohol consumption, 2) assess socio-demographic predictors of alcohol consumption, and 3) describe associations between alcohol consumption and health-related maternal and foetal outcomes. Data related to 34,090 births between 2000 and 2010 was obtained from the Medical Birth Registry at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC) in Moshi, Tanzania and analysed. Poisson regression analysis was used to assess associations between potential risk factors and alcohol consumption, and between alcohol consumption during pregnancy and maternal and foetal health outcomes. From 2000 to 2010, the proportion of women reporting alcohol consumption during pregnancy decreased from 49.5 to 21.5 %. The socio-demographic predictors most strongly related to alcohol consumption were religion (Catholics 53.6 %, Protestants 25.9 %, Muslims 14.8 %) and tribe (Chaggas 45.2 %, Pares 17.3 %, Maasais 6.6 %). Pregnant women consuming alcohol were more likely to be older, taller, and have higher pre-pregnancy body mass index, and were less likely to present with anaemia (Hb < 11.0 g/dl) at last antenatal care (ANC) visit/at admission; adjusted relative risk (ARR) 0.84 (95 % confidence interval 0.79-0.90) for alcohol consumption vs. abstinence. Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy was associated with a decreased risk of being small for gestational age (ARR 0.87 (0.80-0.94) and a decreased risk of gestational age less than 37 weeks (ARR 0.89 (0.81-0.99). The proportion of pregnant women reporting alcohol consumption decreased by 56.5 % from 2000 to 2010. Alcohol intake was strongly associated with socio-demographic factors. The association between alcohol intake and favourable perinatal outcomes remained significant after maternal factors were adjusted for. Information on diet, lifestyle factors and maternal health might give further insight into this unexpected observation. The proportion of pregnant women consuming alcohol in Northern Tanzania is high, and greater awareness of health outcomes associated with alcohol consumption is advised.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 134 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 22%
Student > Bachelor 20 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Researcher 10 7%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 24 18%
Unknown 29 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 16%
Social Sciences 12 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 5%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 34 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,518,735
of 6,381,123 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#829
of 1,375 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,939
of 196,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#50
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,381,123 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,375 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 196,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.