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Cannabinoid-based drugs targeting CB1 and TRPV1, the sympathetic nervous system, and arthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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16 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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40 Dimensions

Readers on

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156 Mendeley
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Title
Cannabinoid-based drugs targeting CB1 and TRPV1, the sympathetic nervous system, and arthritis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0743-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Torsten Lowin, Rainer H. Straub

Abstract

Chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is accompanied by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, which can support the immune system to perpetuate inflammation. Several animal models of arthritis already demonstrated a profound influence of adrenergic signaling on the course of RA. Peripheral norepinephrine release from sympathetic terminals is controlled by cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), which is activated by two major endocannabinoids (ECs), arachidonylethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-arachidonylglycerol. These ECs also modulate function of transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) located on sensory nerve fibers, which are abundant in arthritic synovial tissue. TRPs not only induce the sensation of pain but also support inflammation via secretion of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides. In addition, many cell types in synovial tissue express CB1 and TRPs. In this review, we focus on CB1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated effects on RA since most anti-inflammatory mechanisms induced by cannabinoids are attributed to cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) activation. We demonstrate how CB1 agonism or antagonism can modulate arthritic disease. The concept of functional antagonism with continuous CB1 activation is discussed. Since fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a major EC-degrading enzyme, the therapeutic possibility of FAAH inhibition is studied. Finally, the therapeutic potential of ECs is examined since they interact with cannabinoid receptors and TRPs but do not produce central side effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 156 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 155 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 18%
Student > Bachelor 23 15%
Researcher 21 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 12%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 21 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 14%
Neuroscience 14 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 12 8%
Other 32 21%
Unknown 31 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2020.
All research outputs
#2,367,742
of 17,812,415 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#594
of 2,624 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,554
of 247,838 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,812,415 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,624 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,838 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them