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An iconic traditional apiculture of park fringe communities of Borena Sayint National Park, north eastern Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2015
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2 tweeters

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Title
An iconic traditional apiculture of park fringe communities of Borena Sayint National Park, north eastern Ethiopia
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0051-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hussien Adal, Zemede Asfaw, Zerihun Woldu, Sebsebe Demissew, Patrick van Damme

Abstract

Traditional apiculture has been practised in Ethiopia over a long historical period and still remains a benign means to extract direct benefits from natural ecosystems. While its contribution to economic development and watershed protection is increasingly recognized its cultural significance is however, seldom noticed. This study was conducted using an ethnobotanical study approach to document the honey bee flora and associated indigenous knowledge of local communities in Borena Sayint National Park (BSNP), north eastern Ethiopia. Data were collected from 170 informants through semi-structured interviews and guided field walks, focus group discussion with 37 informants and 14 key informants and analyzed using standard analytical tools including ranking, comparisons and multivariate analyses. In total, 152 bee forage species in 133 genera and 74 families were documented. The Asteraceae and Rosaceae were represented with six species each over the other plant families. Percentage of mentions per species ranged between 76.9 and 13.5 % for the most salient bee forage species. Dombeya torrida, Erica arborea, and Olinia rochetiana captured high community consensus as measured by rank order of popularity and designated as local appellation names of honey. Cluster analysis of priority ranking data showed relationships between key informants with respect to preferences, but ordination analysis did not indicate environmental proximity as a determinant of their responses. Five honey harvesting seasons occur each corresponding to the floral calendar of a dominant bee forage species that stipulate relocation of hives to appropriate locations within the national park. The apicultural tradition is iconic with economic value and forming part of the local peoples' cultural identity apt to be preserved as a bequest for posterity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 2%
United States 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 62 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 14%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 5%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 18 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 29%
Environmental Science 8 12%
Social Sciences 5 8%
Engineering 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 21 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 September 2015.
All research outputs
#16,289,726
of 20,957,071 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#570
of 703 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,704
of 254,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,957,071 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 703 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them