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Use of participatory visual narrative methods to explore older adults’ experiences of managing multiple chronic conditions during care transitions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
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Title
Use of participatory visual narrative methods to explore older adults’ experiences of managing multiple chronic conditions during care transitions
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3292-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chantal Backman, Dawn Stacey, Michelle Crick, Danielle Cho-Young, Patricia B. Marck

Abstract

Older adults with multiple chronic conditions typically have more complex care needs that require multiple transitions between healthcare settings. Poor care transitions often lead to fragmentation in care, decreased quality of care, and increased adverse events. Emerging research recommends the strong need to engage patients and families to improve the quality of their care. However, there are gaps in evidence on the most effective approaches for fully engaging patients/clients and families in their transitional care. The purpose of this study was to engage older adults with multiple chronic conditions and their family members in the detailed exploration of their experiences during transitions across health care settings and identify potential areas for future interventions. This was a qualitative study using participatory visual narrative methods informed by a socio-ecological perspective. Narrated photo walkabouts were conducted with older adults and family members (n = 4 older adults alone, n = 3 family members alone, and n = 2 older adult/family member together) between February and September 2016. The data analysis of the transcripts consisted of an iterative process until consensus on the coding and analysis was reached. A common emerging theme was that older adults and their family members identified the importance of active involvement in managing their own care transitions. Other themes included positive experiences during care transitions; accessing community services and resources; as well as challenges with follow-up care. Participants also felt a lack of meaningful engagement during discharge planning, and they also identified the presence of systemic barriers in care transitions. The results contribute to our understanding that person- and family-centered care transitions should focus on the need for active involvement of older adults and their families in managing care transitions. Based on the results, three areas for improvement specific to older adults managing chronic conditions during care transitions emerged: strengthening support for person- and family-centered care, engaging older adults and families in their care transitions, and providing better support and resources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 101 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Other 8 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 29 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 29 29%
Social Sciences 8 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 8%
Computer Science 4 4%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 35 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,528,327
of 13,216,344 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#3,682
of 4,407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,872
of 266,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,216,344 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,407 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,568 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them