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The prognostic value of the suPARnostic®ELISA in HIV-1 infected individuals is not affected by uPAR promoter polymorphisms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2007
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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20 Mendeley
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Title
The prognostic value of the suPARnostic®ELISA in HIV-1 infected individuals is not affected by uPAR promoter polymorphisms
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2007
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-7-134
Pubmed ID
Authors

Uffe V Schneider, Rikke L Nielsen, Court Pedersen, Jesper Eugen-Olsen

Abstract

High blood levels of soluble urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) are associated with poor outcomes in human immunodeficiency-1 (HIV-1) infected individuals. Research on the clinical value of suPAR in HIV-1 infection led to the development of the suPARnostic(R) assay for commercial use in 2006. The aim of this study was to: 1) Evaluate the prognostic value of the new suPARnostic assay and 2) Determine whether polymorphisms in the active promoter of uPAR influences survival and/or suPAR values in HIV-1 patients who are antiretroviral therapy (ART) naive. DNA samples were collected retrospectively from 145 Danes infected with HIV-1 with known seroconversion times. In addition, plasma was collected retrospectively from 81 of these participants for use in the suPAR analysis. Survival was analysed using Kaplan Meier analysis. Survival was strongly correlated to suPAR levels (p < 0.001). Levels at or above 6 ng/ml were associated with death in 13 of 27 patients within a two-years period; whereas only one of 54 patients with suPAR levels below 6 ng/ml died during this period. We identified two common uPAR promoter polymorphisms: a G to A transition at -118 and an A to G transition at -465 comparative to the transcription start site. These promoter transitions influenced neither suPAR levels nor patient survival. Plasma suPAR levels, as measured by the suPARnostic(R) assay, were strongly predictive of survival in ART-naïve HIV-1 infected patients. Furthermore, plasma suPAR levels were not influenced by uPAR promoter polymorphisms.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 20%
Professor 3 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 5 25%
Unknown 2 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Mathematics 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,405,868
of 5,557,318 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#693
of 2,916 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,727
of 193,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#54
of 165 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,557,318 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,916 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 193,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 165 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.