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Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, September 2015
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  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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49 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Mutation status concordance between primary lesions and metastatic sites of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and the impact of mutation testing methodologies: a literature review
Published in
Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13046-015-0207-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Sherwood, Simon Dearden, Marianne Ratcliffe, Jill Walker

Abstract

Increased understanding of the genetic aetiology of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (aNSCLC) has facilitated personalised therapies that target specific molecular aberrations associated with the disease. Biopsy samples for mutation testing may be taken from primary or metastatic sites, depending on which sample is most accessible, and upon differing diagnostic practices between territories. However, the mutation status concordance between primary tumours and corresponding metastases is the subject of debate. This review aims to ascertain whether molecular diagnostic testing of either the primary or metastatic tumours is equally suitable to determine patient eligibility for targeted therapies. A literature search was performed to identify articles reporting studies of mutations in matched primary and metastatic aNSCLC tumour samples. Clinical results of mutation status concordance between matched primary and metastatic tumour samples from patients with aNSCLC were collated. Articles included in this review (N =26) all reported mutation status data from matched primary and metastatic tumour samples obtained from adult patients with aNSCLC. Generally, substantial concordance was observed between primary and metastatic tumours in terms of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, p16 and p53 mutations. However, some level of discordance was seen in most studies; mutation testing methodologies appeared to play a key role in this, along with underlying tumour heterogeneity. Substantial concordance in mutation status observed between primary and metastatic tumour sites suggests that diagnostic testing of either tumour type may be suitable to determine a patient's eligibility for personalised therapies. As with all diagnostic testing, highly sensitive and appropriately validated mutation analysis methodologies are desirable to ensure accuracy. Additional work is also required to define how much discordance is clinically significant given natural tumour heterogeneity. The ability of both primary and metastatic tumour sites to accurately reflect the tumour mutation status will allow more patients to receive therapies personalised to their disease.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 3%
Italy 1 3%
Unknown 29 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 35%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Student > Master 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 48%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,958,541
of 11,234,968 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#76
of 590 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,340
of 237,153 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
#3
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,234,968 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 590 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,153 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.