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Correlations between exploratory eye movement, hallucination, and cortical gray matter volume in people with schizophrenia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Correlations between exploratory eye movement, hallucination, and cortical gray matter volume in people with schizophrenia
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12888-018-1806-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linlin Qiu, Hao Yan, Risheng Zhu, Jun Yan, Huishu Yuan, Yonghua Han, Weihua Yue, Lin Tian, Dai Zhang

Abstract

Widespread cortical gray matter alternations in people with schizophrenia are correlated with both psychotic symptoms and cognitive/behavioral abnormalities, including the impairments of exploratory eye movement (EEM). Particularly, the loss of gray matter density is specifically related to deficits of the responsive search score (RSS) of EEM in schizophrenia. It is unknown, however, whether the schizophrenia-related RSS deficits are associated with certain psychotic symptoms, such as hallucinations. In 33 participants with schizophrenia, the measurement of EEM, assessment of the hallucination severity using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and a voxel-based morphometric analysis of cortical gray matter volume (GMV) were conducted to investigate the relationships between the RSS of EEM, symptom severity, and GMV. In 29 matched healthy controls, the measurement of EEM and a voxel-based morphometric analysis of cortical GMV were also conducted to investigate the relationship between the RSS of EEM and GMV. In participants with schizophrenia, the hallucination severity was significantly negatively correlated with both the RSS and the GMV of a large number of brain regions in the frontal, temporal, parietal, orbitofrontal, calcarine, cingulate, and insular cortices, and rolandic operculum, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus. Also in participants with schizophrenia, the RSS was significantly positively correlated with the GMV in the left supplementary motor area (SMA), left superior frontal cortex (SFG), bilateral precentral gyri, bilateral postcentral gyri, and bilateral middle frontal cortices. More importantly, the GMV of the SMA, SFG, and precentral gyrus in the left hemisphere was not only significantly negatively correlated with the hallucination severity but also significantly positively correlated with the RSS. No significant correlation could be revealed between the RSS and the GMV of any brain regions in healthy controls. There was a significantly negative association between the hallucination severity and the RSS of EEM, suggesting that the RSS may be a potential biomarker for predicting the hallucination severity of schizophrenia. Also, the GMV of the left SMA, SFG, and precentral gyrus may be the common substrates underlying both hallucination induction and the RSS in people with schizophrenia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Researcher 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 12 24%
Neuroscience 6 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 10%
Decision Sciences 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 21 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,311,905
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#1,731
of 3,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,500
of 272,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,401 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them