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Reasons for home delivery and use of traditional birth attendants in rural Zambia: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
470 Mendeley
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Title
Reasons for home delivery and use of traditional birth attendants in rural Zambia: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0652-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cephas Sialubanje, Karlijn Massar, Davidson H. Hamer, Robert AC Ruiter

Abstract

Despite the policy change stopping traditional birth attendants (TBAs) from conducting deliveries at home and encouraging all women to give birth at the clinic under skilled care, many women still give birth at home and TBAs are essential providers of obstetric care in rural Zambia. The main reasons for pregnant women's preference for TBAs are not well understood. This qualitative study aimed to identify reasons motivating women to giving birth at home and seek the help of TBAs. This knowledge is important for the design of public health interventions focusing on promoting facility-based skilled birth attendance in Zambia. We conducted ten focus group discussions (n = 100) with women of reproductive age (15-45 years) in five health centre catchment areas with the lowest institutional delivery rates in the district. In addition, a total of 30 in-depth interviews were conducted comprising 5 TBAs, 4 headmen, 4 husbands, 4 mothers, 4 neighbourhood health committee (NHC) members, 4 community health workers (CHWs) and 5 nurses. Perspectives on TBAs, the decision-making process regarding home delivery and use of TBAs, and reasons for preference of TBAs and their services were explored. Our findings show that women's lack of decision- making autonomy regarding child birth, dependence on the husband and other family members for the final decision, and various physical and socioeconomic barriers including long distances, lack of money for transport and the requirement to bring baby clothes and food while staying at the clinic, prevented them from delivering at a clinic. In addition, socio-cultural norms regarding childbirth, negative attitude towards the quality of services provided at the clinic, made most women deliver at home. Moreover, most women had a positive attitude towards TBAs and perceived them to be respectful, skilled, friendly, trustworthy, and available when they needed them. Our findings suggest a need to empower women with decision-making skills regarding childbirth and to lower barriers that prevent them from going to the health facility in time. There is also need to improve the quality of existing facility-based delivery services and to strengthen linkages between TBAs and the formal health system.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 470 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Unknown 466 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 120 26%
Student > Bachelor 52 11%
Researcher 50 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 46 10%
Student > Postgraduate 33 7%
Other 75 16%
Unknown 94 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 123 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 110 23%
Social Sciences 65 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 7 1%
Other 47 10%
Unknown 110 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2022.
All research outputs
#6,645,486
of 22,351,998 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,836
of 4,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,855
of 256,969 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,351,998 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,067 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,969 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them