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Bioluminescence imaging visualizes osteopontin-induced neurogenesis and neuroblast migration in the mouse brain after stroke

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2018
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Title
Bioluminescence imaging visualizes osteopontin-induced neurogenesis and neuroblast migration in the mouse brain after stroke
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13287-018-0927-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Rogall, Monika Rabenstein, Sabine Vay, Annika Bach, Anton Pikhovych, Johannes Baermann, Mathias Hoehn, Sébastien Couillard-Despres, Gereon Rudolf Fink, Michael Schroeter, Maria Adele Rueger

Abstract

Osteopontin (OPN), an acidic phosphoglycoprotein, is upregulated in the brain after cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that OPN supports migration, survival, and proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC) in primary cell culture, as well as their differentiation into neurons. We here analyzed the effects of OPN on neuroblasts in vivo in the context of cerebral ischemia. Transgenic mice expressing luciferase under the control of the neuroblast-specific doublecortin (DCX)-promoter, allowing visualization of neuroblasts in vivo using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), were injected with OPN intracerebroventricularly while control mice were injected with vehicle buffer. To assess the effects of OPN after ischemia, additional mice were subjected to photothrombosis and injected with either OPN or vehicle. OPN enhanced the migration of neuroblasts both in the healthy brain and after ischemia, as quantified by BLI in vivo. Moreover, the number of neural progenitors was increased following OPN treatment, with the maximum effect on the second day after OPN injection into the healthy brain, and 14 days after OPN injection following ischemia. After ischemia, OPN quantitatively promoted the endogenous, ischemia-induced neuroblast expansion, and additionally recruited progenitors from the contralateral hemisphere. Our results strongly suggest that OPN constitutes a promising substance for the targeted activation of neurogenesis in ischemic stroke.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 13 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 8 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 16 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2018.
All research outputs
#12,217,931
of 13,801,769 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1,063
of 1,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#231,536
of 269,575 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,801,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,216 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,575 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.