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Marked attenuation of the amplitude of transcranial motor-evoked potentials after intravenous bolus administration of ketamine: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, July 2018
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Title
Marked attenuation of the amplitude of transcranial motor-evoked potentials after intravenous bolus administration of ketamine: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13256-018-1741-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenta Furutani, Mari Matsuhashi, Hiroyuki Deguchi, Yusuke Mitsuma, Nobuko Ohashi, Hiroshi Baba

Abstract

It is believed that ketamine does not affect motor-evoked potential amplitude, whereas various anesthetic drugs attenuate the amplitude of transcranial motor-evoked potential. However, we encountered a patient with marked attenuation of motor-evoked potential amplitude after intravenous bolus administration of ketamine. A 15-year-old Japanese girl with a diagnosis of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was admitted to our hospital to undergo posterior spinal fusion at T4-L3. After induction of general anesthesia using a continuous infusion of propofol and remifentanil, we confirmed that transcranial electrical motor-evoked potentials were being recorded correctly. Ketamine 1.25 mg/kg was administered intravenously for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. About 3 minutes later, the motor-evoked potential amplitude was markedly attenuated. No other drugs were administered except for ketamine. The patient's vital signs were stable, and the surgery had not yet started. The motor-evoked potential amplitude was recovered at about 6 minutes after administration of ketamine. The surgery was performed uneventfully, and the patient had no neurologic deficit when she emerged from general anesthesia. Although there is a widely held belief in the field of anesthesiology that ketamine does not affect motor-evoked potential amplitude, it has been suggested that ketamine could affect its monitoring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 22%
Student > Postgraduate 2 22%
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Student > Master 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2018.
All research outputs
#10,554,901
of 13,253,522 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1,249
of 2,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,498
of 266,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,253,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,248 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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