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Rationale, design, and characteristics of the multimedia family planning campaign for a small, happy, and prosperous family in Ethiopia (SHaPE)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2018
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1 tweeter

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1 Dimensions

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55 Mendeley
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Title
Rationale, design, and characteristics of the multimedia family planning campaign for a small, happy, and prosperous family in Ethiopia (SHaPE)
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5799-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hye-Jin Paek, Ho Kim, Youngtae Cho, Wonsik Hong, Woorim Ko, Haejin Choi, Youngok Youn, Yunhee Choi, Gizachew Balew, Youngah Doh

Abstract

Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Africa, has a total fertility rate of 4.6, a decrease from 5.5 in 2000. However, only 35.3% of women in the reproductive age group use modern family planning (FP) methods, and the 22.3% of them who have an unmet need for family planning is among the highest rates in sub-Saharan African countries. The Small, Happy, and Prosperous family in Ethiopia (SHaPE) is one of the country's first comprehensive multimedia family planning campaigns. Its purpose is to increase FP-related knowledge, attitude, and practice of Ethiopians, particularly women of reproductive age. The SHaPE campaign has multiple components: (1) a nationwide representative survey, which serves as formative research to identify region-specific and culture-appropriate media, messages, and barriers and determinants of family planning; (2) a multimedia communication campaign intervention, including radio dramas and other interpersonal, community-level, and mass media channels; and (3) campaign evaluation, including pre-, process-, and post-evaluation research using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The main target population for SHaPE is reproductive age women and men in three regions: Amhara, Oromia, and Somali. These regions take up about 66.6% of the entire country and have distinct ethnicities, cultures, and languages. SHaPE contributes to existing family planning research and intervention because it is theory- and evidence-based, and it employs integrated marketing communications and entertainment-education approaches with key messages that are tailored to audiences within unique cultures. But even within a country, a nationwide campaign with uniform messages is neither possible nor desirable due to different cultures, norms, and languages across regions. Last, media campaigns in developing and underdeveloped countries require constant monitoring of political situations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 55 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 16%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 12 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 10 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Psychology 4 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 10 18%
Unknown 13 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2018.
All research outputs
#8,293,293
of 13,232,126 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,817
of 9,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#158,606
of 266,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,232,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,114 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,324 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.