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Socio-cultural and behavioural factors constraining latrine adoption in rural coastal Odisha: an exploratory qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2015
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
9 tweeters
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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106 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
400 Mendeley
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Title
Socio-cultural and behavioural factors constraining latrine adoption in rural coastal Odisha: an exploratory qualitative study
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2206-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Parimita Routray, Wolf-Peter Schmidt, Sophie Boisson, Thomas Clasen, Marion W. Jenkins

Abstract

Open defecation is widely practiced in India. To improve sanitation and promote better health, the Government of India (GOI) has instituted large scale sanitation programmes supporting construction of public and institutional toilets and extending financial subsidies for poor families in rural areas for building individual household latrines. Nevertheless, many household latrines in rural India, built with government subsidies and the facilitation and support of non-government organizations (NGO), remain unused. Literature on social, cultural and behavioural aspects that constrain latrine adoption and use in rural India is limited. This paper examines defecation patterns of different groups of people in rural areas of Odisha state in India to identify causes and determinants of latrine non-use, with a special focus on government-subsidized latrine owners, and shortcomings in household sanitation infrastructure built with government subsidies. An exploratory study using qualitative methods was conducted in rural communities in Odisha state. Methods used were focus group discussions (FGDs), and observations of latrines and interviews with their owners. FGDs were held with frontline NGO sanitation program staff, and with community members, separately by caste, gender, latrine type, and age group. Data were analysed using a thematic framework and approach. Government subsidized latrines were mostly found unfinished. Many counted as complete per government standards for disbursement of financial subsidies to contracted NGOs were not accepted by their owners and termed as 'incomplete'. These latrines lacked a roof, door, adequate walls and any provision for water supply in or near the cabin, whereas rural people had elaborate processes of cleansing with water post defecation, making presence of a nearby water source important. Habits, socialising, sanitation rituals and daily routines varying with caste, gender, marital status, age and lifestyle, also hindered the adoption of latrines. Interest in constructing latrines was observed among male heads for their female members especially a newlywed daughter-in-law, reflecting concerns for their privacy, security, and convenience. This paper elaborates on these different factors. Findings show that providing infrastructure does not ensure use when there are significant and culturally engrained behavioural barriers to using latrines. Future sanitation programmes in rural India need to focus on understanding and addressing these behavioural barriers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 400 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 3 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Unknown 393 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 98 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 14%
Researcher 42 11%
Student > Bachelor 30 8%
Student > Postgraduate 27 7%
Other 69 17%
Unknown 80 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 62 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 52 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 48 12%
Environmental Science 28 7%
Engineering 24 6%
Other 73 18%
Unknown 113 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 February 2020.
All research outputs
#719,217
of 18,699,798 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#727
of 12,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,606
of 250,501 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,699,798 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,409 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,501 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them