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Ancient gene duplications have shaped developmental stage-specific expression in Pristionchus pacificus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Ancient gene duplications have shaped developmental stage-specific expression in Pristionchus pacificus
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0466-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Praveen Baskaran, Christian Rödelsperger, Neel Prabh, Vahan Serobyan, Gabriel V. Markov, Antje Hirsekorn, Christoph Dieterich

Abstract

The development of multicellular organisms is accompanied by gene expression changes in differentiating cells. Profiling stage-specific expression during development may reveal important insights into gene sets that contributed to the morphological diversity across the animal kingdom. We sequenced RNA-seq libraries throughout a developmental timecourse of the nematode Pristionchus pacificus. The transcriptomes reflect early larval stages, adult worms including late larvae, and growth-arrested dauer larvae and allowed the identification of developmentally regulated gene clusters. Our data reveals similar trends as previous transcriptome profiling of dauer worms and represents the first expression data for early larvae in P. pacificus. Gene expression clusters characterizing early larval stages show most significant enrichments of chaperones, while collagens are most significantly enriched in transcriptomes of late larvae and adult worms. By combining expression data with phylogenetic analysis, we found that developmentally regulated genes are found in paralogous clusters that have arisen through lineage-specific duplications after the split from the Caenorhabditis elegans branch. We propose that gene duplications of developmentally regulated genes represent a plausible evolutionary mechanism to increase the dosage of stage-specific expression. Consequently, this may contribute to the substantial divergence in expression profiles that has been observed across larger evolutionary time scales.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Researcher 6 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 31%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Computer Science 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,028,187
of 16,638,522 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,776
of 2,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,816
of 203,826 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,638,522 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,775 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 203,826 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them