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Collateral damage of using colistin in hospitalized patients on emergence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization and infection

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, July 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Collateral damage of using colistin in hospitalized patients on emergence of colistin-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization and infection
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13756-018-0375-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. Wangchinda, N. Pati, N. Maknakhon, C. Seenama, S. Tiengrim, V. Thamlikitkul

Abstract

Colistin has been used for therapy of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative infections in Thailand, especially carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, for more than 10 years. However, the prevalence of colistin-resistant A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa is still less than 5%. Colistin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae has been increasingly reported globally over the past few years and the use of colistin in food animals might be associated with an emergence of colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. This study aimed to determine the effect of colistin exposure in hospitalized patients who received colistin on development of colistin-resistant (CoR) Escherichia coli (EC) or Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) colonization and infection. A prospective observational study was performed in adult hospitalized patients at Siriraj Hospital who received colistin for treatment of infections during December 2016 and November 2017. The surveillance culture samples were collected from the stool and the site of infection of each patient who received colistin at the study enrollment, days 3 and 7 after the study enrollment, and once a week thereafter for determination of CoR EC and CoR KP. CoR EC and CoR KP were also tested for a presence of mcr-1 gene. One hundred thirty-nine patients were included. Overall prevalence of CoR EC or CoR KP colonization was 47.5% among 139 subjects. Prevalence of CoR EC or CoR KP colonization was 17.3% of subjects at study enrollment, and 30.2% after study enrollment. Use of fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and colistin was found to be significantly associated with CoR EC or CoR KP colonization. The mcr-1 gene was detected in 13.0% of CoR EC or CoR KP isolates, and in 27.3% of subjects with CoR EC or CoR KP colonization. CoR EC or CoR KP colonization persisted in 65.2% of the subjects at the end of the study. Five patients with CoR KP infections received combination antibiotics and they were alive at hospital discharge. Prevalence of CoR EC or CoR KP colonization in hospitalized patients receiving colistin was high and it was associated with the use of colistin. Therefore, patients who receive colistin are at risk of developing CoR EC or CoR KP colonization and infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 69 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 20%
Other 10 14%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 19 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 23 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2019.
All research outputs
#843,985
of 16,421,577 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#100
of 947 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,560
of 226,209 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,421,577 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 947 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,209 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them