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Self-assembling functional programmable protein array for studying protein–protein interactions in malaria parasites

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2018
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Self-assembling functional programmable protein array for studying protein–protein interactions in malaria parasites
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2414-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gabriela Arévalo-Pinzón, María González-González, Carlos Fernando Suárez, Hernando Curtidor, Javier Carabias-Sánchez, Antonio Muro, Joshua LaBaer, Manuel Alfonso Patarroyo, Manuel Fuentes

Abstract

Plasmodium vivax is the most widespread malarial species, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Knowledge is limited regarding the molecular mechanism of invasion due to the lack of a continuous in vitro culture system for these species. Since protein-protein and host-cell interactions play an essential role in the microorganism's invasion and replication, elucidating protein function during invasion is critical when developing more effective control methods. Nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) has thus become a suitable technology for studying protein-protein and host-protein interactions since producing proteins through the in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) method overcomes most of the drawbacks encountered to date, such as heterologous protein production, stability and purification. Twenty P. vivax proteins on merozoite surface or in secretory organelles were selected and successfully cloned using gateway technology. Most constructs were displayed in the array expressed in situ, using the IVTT method. The Pv12 protein was used as bait for evaluating array functionality and co-expressed with P. vivax cDNA display in the array. It was found that Pv12 interacted with Pv41 (as previously described), as well as PvMSP142kDa, PvRBP1a, PvMSP8 and PvRAP1. NAPPA is a high-performance technique enabling co-expression of bait and query in situ, thereby enabling interactions to be analysed rapidly and reproducibly. It offers a fresh alternative for studying protein-protein and ligand-receptor interactions regarding a parasite which is difficult to cultivate (i.e. P. vivax).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Researcher 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 10 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Chemistry 2 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 10 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,976,854
of 13,243,534 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,747
of 3,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#147,878
of 266,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,243,534 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,873 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,406 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them