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Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates COPD-like characteristics in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice

Overview of attention for article published in Respiratory Research, September 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates COPD-like characteristics in the lungs of cigarette smoke-exposed mice
Published in
Respiratory Research, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12931-015-0271-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nele Heulens, Hannelie Korf, Nele Cielen, Elien De Smidt, Karen Maes, Conny Gysemans, Erik Verbeken, Ghislaine Gayan-Ramirez, Chantal Mathieu, Wim Janssens

Abstract

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by excessive inflammation and disturbed bacterial clearance in the airways. Although cigarette smoke (CS) exposure poses a major risk, vitamin D deficiency could potentially contribute to COPD progression. Many in vitro studies demonstrate important anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects of vitamin D, but a direct contribution of vitamin D deficiency to COPD onset and disease progression has not been explored. In the current study, we used a murine experimental model to investigate the combined effect of vitamin D deficiency and CS exposure on the development of COPD-like characteristics. Therefore, vitamin D deficient or control mice were exposed to CS or ambient air for a period of 6 (subacute) or 12 weeks (chronic). Besides lung function and structure measurements, we performed an in depth analysis of the size and composition of the cellular infiltrate in the airways and lung parenchyma and tested the ex vivo phagocytic and oxidative burst capacity of alveolar macrophages. Vitamin D deficient mice exhibited an accelerated lung function decline following CS exposure compared to control mice. Furthermore, early signs of emphysema were only observed in CS-exposed vitamin D deficient mice, which was accompanied by elevated levels of MMP-12 in the lung. Vitamin D deficient mice showed exacerbated infiltration of inflammatory cells in the airways and lung parenchyma after both subacute and chronic CS exposure compared to control mice. Furthermore, elevated levels of typical proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines could be detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (KC and TNF-α) and lung tissue (IP-10, MCP-1, IL-12) of CS-exposed vitamin D deficient mice compared to control mice. Finally, although CS greatly impaired the ex vivo phagocytic and oxidative burst function of alveolar macrophages, vitamin D deficient mice did not feature an additional defect. Our data demonstrate that vitamin D deficiency both accelerates and aggravates the development of characteristic disease features of COPD. As vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent, large randomized trials exploring effects of vitamin D supplementation on lung function decline and COPD onset are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 4%
Unknown 49 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 17 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 20 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2017.
All research outputs
#4,209,565
of 16,510,533 outputs
Outputs from Respiratory Research
#473
of 2,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,597
of 204,019 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Respiratory Research
#3
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,510,533 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,093 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 204,019 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.