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Effects of population structure on pollen flow, clonality rates and reproductive success in fragmented Serapias lingua populations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, September 2015
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Title
Effects of population structure on pollen flow, clonality rates and reproductive success in fragmented Serapias lingua populations
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12870-015-0600-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giuseppe Pellegrino, Francesca Bellusci, Anna Maria Palermo

Abstract

Fragmentation of habitats by roads, railroads, fields, buildings and other human activities can affect population size, pollination success, sexual and asexual reproduction specially in plants showing pollinator limitation, such as Mediterranean orchids. In this study, we assessed pollen flow, selfing rates, vegetative reproduction and female reproductive success and their correlations with habitat characters in nine fragmented subpopulations of Serapias lingua. To improve understanding of population structure effects on plant biology, we examined genetic differentiation among populations, pollen flow, selfing rates and clonal reproduction using nuclear microsatellite markers. Smaller populations showed a significant heterozygote deficit occurred at all five nuclear microsatellite loci, the coefficient of genetic differentiation among populations was 0.053 and pairwise FST was significantly correlated with the geographical distance between populations. Paternity analysis of seeds showed that most pollen flow occurred within a population and there was a positive correlation between percentage of received pollen and distance between populations. The fruit production rate varied between 5.10 % and 20.30 % and increased with increasing population size, while the percentage of viable seeds (78-85 %) did not differ significantly among populations. The extent of clonality together with the clonal and sexual reproductive strategies varied greatly among the nine populations and correlated with the habitats where they occur. The small, isolated populations tended to have high clonal diversity and low fruit production, whereas the large populations with little disturbance were prone to have reductions in clonal growth and increased sexual reproduction. We found that clonality offers an advantage in small and isolated populations of S. lingua, where clones may have a greater ability to persist than sexually reproducing individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 35%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 16%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Lecturer 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 55%
Environmental Science 3 10%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2015.
All research outputs
#5,418,776
of 6,360,702 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#778
of 975 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#148,266
of 185,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#53
of 66 outputs
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