↓ Skip to main content

Aerobic exercise training enhances the in vivo cholesterol trafficking from macrophages to the liver independently of changes in the expression of genes involved in lipid flux in macrophages and aorta

Overview of attention for article published in Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Aerobic exercise training enhances the in vivo cholesterol trafficking from macrophages to the liver independently of changes in the expression of genes involved in lipid flux in macrophages and aorta
Published in
Lipids in Health and Disease, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12944-015-0093-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paula Ramos Pinto, Débora Dias Ferraretto Moura Rocco, Ligia Shimabukuro Okuda, Adriana Machado-Lima, Gabriela Castilho, Karolline Santana da Silva, Diego Juvenal Gomes, Raphael de Souza Pinto, Rodrigo Tallada Iborra, Guilherme da Silva Ferreira, Edna Regina Nakandakare, Ubiratan Fabres Machado, Maria Lucia Cardillo Correa-Giannella, Sergio Catanozi, Marisa Passarelli

Abstract

Regular exercise prevents and regresses atherosclerosis by improving lipid metabolism and antioxidant defenses. Exercise ameliorates the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), an antiatherogenic system that drives cholesterol from arterial macrophages to the liver for excretion into bile and feces. In this study we analyzed the role of aerobic exercise on the in vivo RCT and expression of genes and proteins involved in lipid flux and inflammation in peritoneal macrophages, aortic arch and liver from wild type mice. Twelve-week-old male mice were divided into sedentary and trained groups. Exercise training was performed in a treadmill (15 m/min, 30 min/day, 5 days/week). Plasma lipids were determined by enzymatic methods and lipoprotein profile by fast protein liquid chromatography. After intraperitoneal injection of J774-macrophages the RCT was assessed by measuring the recovery of (3)H-cholesterol in plasma, feces and liver. The expression of liver receptors was determined by immunoblot, macrophages and aortic mRNAs by qRT-PCR. (14)C-cholesterol efflux mediated by apo A-I and HDL2 and the uptake of (3)H-cholesteryl oleoyl ether ((3)H-COE)-acetylated-LDL were determined in macrophages isolated from sedentary and trained animals 48 h after the last exercise session. Body weight, plasma lipids, lipoprotein profile, glucose and blood pressure were not modified by exercise training. A greater amount of (3)H-cholesterol was recovered in plasma (24 h and 48 h) and liver (48 h) from trained animals in comparison to sedentary. No difference was found in (3)H-cholesterol excreted in feces between trained and sedentary mice. The hepatic expression of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and LDL receptor (B-E) was enhanced by exercise. We observed 2.8 and 1.7 fold rise, respectively, in LXR and Cyp7a mRNA in the liver of trained as compared to sedentary mice. Macrophage and aortic expression of genes involved in lipid efflux was not systematically changed by physical exercise. In agreement, (14)C-cholestrol efflux and uptake of (3)H-COE-acetylated-LDL by macrophages was similar between sedentary and trained animals. Aerobic exercise in vivo accelerates the traffic of cholesterol from macrophages to the liver contributing to prevention and regression of atherosclerosis, independently of changes in macrophage and aorta gene expression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 24%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 20%
Sports and Recreations 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 13 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,998,716
of 6,360,702 outputs
Outputs from Lipids in Health and Disease
#276
of 593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,984
of 198,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Lipids in Health and Disease
#12
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,360,702 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 593 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,186 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.