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Scrub typhus mimicking Parkinson’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, September 2015
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Title
Scrub typhus mimicking Parkinson’s disease
Published in
BMC Research Notes, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1428-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ranjan Premaratna, S. H. Nuwan Chamara Wijayalath, J. K. N. Dhanushka Miththinda, N. K. B. K. R. G. Wijesinghe Bandara, H. Janaka de Silva

Abstract

Scrub typhus is a re-emerging infection in Sri Lanka. It often poses a diagnostic challenge and tends to present as a febrile illness of uncertain origin. Undiagnosed illness may progress to serious multi-systemic complications. Here we report a case of scrub typhus presenting with features of Parkinsonism. A 62-year-old previously healthy Sri Lankan native male from the Western province of Sri Lanka presented with high fever with malaise, myalgia and arthralgia for 17 days. On the 5th day of illness he developed intermittent resting tremor in his right arm and leg associated with stiffness, difficulty in carrying out normal work and difficulty in smiling. He denied similar previous episodes. There were no other associated neurological manifestations. Clinical examination revealed a high amplitude low frequency resting tremor in his right hand, a mask-like face and increased muscle tone limited to the right side with normal reflexes. The rest of the system examination was normal except for an eschar over the abdomen. His investigations revealed lymphocytic leukocytosis, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and immunofluorescence assay-IgM and IgG against Orientia tsutsugamushi Karp antigen were positive with rising titers. With oral doxycycline and azithromycin his fever settled within 48 h and a complete recovery of Parkinson's features was observed within 2 weeks. Doctors practicing in endemic regions should be familiar with delayed clinical manifestations of scrub typhus and should carefully look for an eschar in order to avoid delay in the diagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Postgraduate 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Other 4 14%
Student > Master 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 24%
Neuroscience 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2015.
All research outputs
#12,515,983
of 14,155,545 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,645
of 3,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,928
of 246,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
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