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Linking altered central pain processing and genetic polymorphism to drug efficacy in chronic low back pain

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, September 2015
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Title
Linking altered central pain processing and genetic polymorphism to drug efficacy in chronic low back pain
Published in
BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40360-015-0023-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andreas Siegenthaler, Jürg Schliessbach, Pascal H. Vuilleumier, Peter Juni, Hanns U. Zeilhofer, Lars Arendt-Nielsen, Michele Curatolo

Abstract

Inability to predict the therapeutic effect of a drug in individual pain patients prolongs the process of drug and dose finding until satisfactory pharmacotherapy can be achieved. Many chronic pain conditions are associated with hypersensitivity of the nervous system or impaired endogenous pain modulation. Pharmacotherapy often aims at influencing these disturbed nociceptive processes. Its effect might therefore depend on the extent to which they are altered. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) can evaluate various aspects of pain processing and might therefore be able to predict the analgesic efficacy of a given drug. In the present study three drugs commonly used in the pharmacological management of chronic low back pain are investigated. The primary objective is to examine the ability of QST to predict pain reduction. As a secondary objective, the analgesic effects of these drugs and their effect on QST are evaluated. In this randomized, double blinded, placebo controlled cross-over study, patients with chronic low back pain are randomly assigned to imipramine, oxycodone or clobazam versus active placebo. QST is assessed at baseline, 1 and 2 h after drug administration. Pain intensity, side effects and patients' global impression of change are assessed in intervals of 30 min up to two hours after drug intake. Baseline QST is used as explanatory variable to predict drug effect. The change in QST over time is analyzed to describe the pharmacodynamic effects of each drug on experimental pain modalities. Genetic polymorphisms are analyzed as co-variables. Pharmacotherapy is a mainstay in chronic pain treatment. Antidepressants, anticonvulsants and opioids are frequently prescribed in a "trial and error" fashion, without knowledge however, which drug suits best which patient. The present study addresses the important need to translate recent advances in pain research to clinical practice. Assessing the predictive value of central hypersensitivity and endogenous pain modulation could allow for the implementation of a mechanism-based treatment strategy in individual patients. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01179828.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 90 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 15 16%
Unknown 25 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Neuroscience 5 5%
Psychology 4 4%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 33 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2016.
All research outputs
#6,821,079
of 7,876,706 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#175
of 197 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,668
of 233,793 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,876,706 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 197 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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