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Phosphoproteome dynamics mediate revival of bacterial spores

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, September 2015
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Title
Phosphoproteome dynamics mediate revival of bacterial spores
Published in
BMC Biology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12915-015-0184-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alex Rosenberg, Boumediene Soufi, Vaishnavi Ravikumar, Nelson C. Soares, Karsten Krug, Yoav Smith, Boris Macek, Sigal Ben-Yehuda

Abstract

Bacterial spores can remain dormant for decades, yet harbor the exceptional capacity to rapidly resume metabolic activity and recommence life. Although germinants and their corresponding receptors have been known for more than 30 years, the molecular events underlying this remarkable cellular transition from dormancy to full metabolic activity are only partially defined. Here, we examined whether protein phospho-modifications occur during germination, the first step of exiting dormancy, thereby facilitating spore revival. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis as a model organism, we performed phosphoproteomic analysis to define the Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteome of a reviving spore. The phosphoproteome was found to chiefly comprise newly identified phosphorylation sites located within proteins involved in basic biological functions, such as transcription, translation, carbon metabolism, and spore-specific determinants. Quantitative comparison of dormant and germinating spore phosphoproteomes revealed phosphorylation dynamics, indicating that phospho-modifications could modulate protein activity during this cellular transition. Furthermore, by mutating select phosphorylation sites located within proteins representative of key biological processes, we established a functional connection between phosphorylation and the progression of spore revival. Herein, we provide, for the first time, a phosphoproteomic view of a germinating bacterial spore. We further show that the spore phosphoproteome is dynamic and present evidence that phosphorylation events play an integral role in facilitating spore revival.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 28%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 26%
Engineering 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 6%
Chemistry 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2015.
All research outputs
#4,471,038
of 6,368,969 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#686
of 761 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,756
of 199,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#27
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,368,969 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 761 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 199,280 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.