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Determination of the optimal mating age of colonised Glossina brevipalpis and Glossina austeni using walk-in field cages in South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
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Title
Determination of the optimal mating age of colonised Glossina brevipalpis and Glossina austeni using walk-in field cages in South Africa
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1073-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chantel J. de Beer, Gert J. Venter, Marc J. B. Vreysen

Abstract

For the control of Glossina brevipalpis and Glossina austeni that occur in South Africa an area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) program with a sterile insect technique (SIT) component has been proposed. The quality of the released sterile male tsetse flies will greatly determine the success of the SIT component of the programme. Sterile males need to be able to compete with wild males immediately after their release in the affected area. The mating competitiveness can be affected by many factors including the optimal mating age of the fly which can have an impact on the timing of the release. To assess the optimal mating age for G. brevipalpis and G. austeni, mating competitiveness studies were carried out in a walk-in field cage. First, the time of peak fly activity was determined by performing the experiment in the morning and then again in the afternoon. Thereafter, 3, 6 and 9-day-old male flies competed for 3-day-old virgin females. There were no significant differences in mating performance when the field cage experiments were done in the morning or in the afternoon. However, the mating latency was shorter in the afternoon than in the morning. For both species 9-day-old males mated significantly more often than 6 or 3-day-old males. Age did not affect the males' ability to transfer sperm, mating duration or the mating latency. All females that mated were inseminated. Age did influence the mating competitiveness of G. brevipalpis and G. austeni and it is recommended that sterile males are not released before the age of 9 days. Keeping the male flies in the rearing facility for 8 days will have economic and logistic consequences for AW-IPM programmes that have a SIT component.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Master 3 10%
Professor 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 40%
Unspecified 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2015.
All research outputs
#5,426,325
of 6,368,969 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,505
of 1,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,147
of 199,193 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#111
of 145 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,790 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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