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Transient detectable viremia and the risk of viral rebound in patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Transient detectable viremia and the risk of viral rebound in patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1120-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jim Young, Martin Rickenbach, Alexandra Calmy, Enos Bernasconi, Cornelia Staehelin, Patrick Schmid, Matthias Cavassini, Manuel Battegay, Huldrych F. Günthard, Heiner C. Bucher

Abstract

Temporary increases in plasma HIV RNA ('blips') are common in HIV patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Blips above 500 copies/mL have been associated with subsequent viral rebound. It is not clear if this relationship still holds when measurements are made using newer more sensitive assays. We selected antiretroviral-naive patients that then recorded one or more episodes of viral suppression on cART with HIV RNA measurements made using more sensitive assays (lower limit of detection below 50 copies/ml). We estimated the association in these episodes between blip magnitude and the time to viral rebound. Four thousand ninety-four patients recorded a first episode of viral suppression on cART using more sensitive assays; 1672 patients recorded at least one subsequent suppression episode. Most suppression episodes (87 %) were recorded with TaqMan version 1 or 2 assays. Of the 2035 blips recorded, 84 %, 12 % and 4 % were of low (50-199 copies/mL), medium (200-499 copies/mL) and high (500-999 copies/mL) magnitude respectively. The risk of viral rebound increased as blip magnitude increased with hazard ratios of 1.20 (95 % CI 0.89-1.61), 1.42 (95 % CI 0.96-2.19) and 1.93 (95 % CI 1.24-3.01) for low, medium and high magnitude blips respectively; an increase of hazard ratio 1.09 (95 % CI 1.03 to 1.15) per 100 copies/mL of HIV RNA. With the more sensitive assays now commonly used for monitoring patients, blips above 200 copies/mL are increasingly likely to lead to viral rebound and should prompt a discussion about adherence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Other 8 18%
Unknown 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2015.
All research outputs
#5,968,823
of 18,321,436 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,966
of 6,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,449
of 257,189 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,321,436 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,438 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,189 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them